Home > News and media > Publications > Publications archive > 2014 > When Soldiers Fall: how Americans have confronted combat losses from World War One to Afghanistan

 

When Soldiers Fall: how Americans have confronted combat losses from World War One to Afghanistan

Steven Casey
Oxford University Press (January 2014)

The extent to which combat casualties influence the public's support for war is one of the most frequently and fiercely debated subjects in current American life and has cast an enormous shadow over both the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. The common assumption, based largely on U.S. experience in past wars, is that the public is in some way casualty averse or casualty shy, and that as losses increase its support for a war will inexorably decline. Yet this assumption has been adopted as conventional wisdom without any awareness of one of the most important dimensions of the issue: how has the public become aware of the casualties sustained during particular wars? To what extent has the government tried to manipulate or massage the figures? When and why have these official figures been challenged by opportunistic political opponents or aggressive scoop-seeking reporters?

  • Steven Casey is Professor of International History at LSE and is a specialist in U.S. foreign policy of the twentieth century.

Purchase this book from the publishers.| 

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|

When_soldiers_fall