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Mexico's Struggle for Public Security: organized crime and state responses

George Philip and Susana Berruecos (eds)
Palgrave Macmillan (5 June 2012)

Organized crime in Mexico has been responsible for a worrying increase in violence in that country since Felipe Calderon assumed the presidency in 2006. The country's main criminal gangs are now a real challenge to the Mexican state. Government policies aimed at combating that threat have not been very successful to date. While it is certainly possible to exaggerate the threat posed by organized crime to the Mexican state, the real problems posed are serious enough.

This book considers the issue from a variety of viewpoints. The essential argument is that the organized crime is best combated by institutional reforms directed at strengthening the rule of law and winning over public opinion rather than by a heavy reliance on armed force. Some such reforms have indeed taken place in Mexico, and are discussed in the book.

  • Professor George Philip is professor of comparative and Latin American politics at LSE.
  • Susana Berruecos is a visiting fellow at LSE.

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Mexico's Struggle for Public Security