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The Chancellors' Tales: managing the British economy

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Howard Davies| (ed)
Polity (1 November 2006)

This remarkable book tells the story of how the British economy has been managed over the last 30 years. The story is told by those who should know more about it than anyone else - the former chancellors of the Exchequer in both Labour and Conservative administrations.

The Chancellors' Tale offers a unique insider view of the management of a modern economy, charting the opportunities and constraints that each chancellor faced. The book provides a rare historical record of the difficulties and dilemmas of managing the British economy in an increasingly global age. Written with both deep insight and wit, the chapters follow the period in office of each of the chancellors. Each chapter offers a detailed account of the handling of the economy during that chancellor's period of office. Taken together they provide a privileged insight into the way the British economy has been run - and why.

The chapters are written by Lord Healey, Lord Howe, Lord Lawson of Blaby, Lord Lamont and Kenneth Clarke MP. The book also contains an introduction by Howard Davies, director of LSE. He provides a context in which to understand the contributions of each of the chapters which follow.

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Press cuttings

Times Literary Supplement
The importance of camouflage, Communist collapse, Off our backs, etc (7 June 07)
Letter, which refers to The Chancellors' Tales, edited by Howard Davies, School director. 

Computing
Talking outsourcing - blog (5 Dec 06)
A regular column by LSE PhD student Mark Kobayashi-Hillary. He refers to the School event The Chancellors' Tales - managing the British economy, held on Wednesday 15 November to launch a book of the same title, edited by director Howard Davies.

Observer
The old bruiser who remained the boy next door (4 Dec 06)
William Keegan interviews Denis Healey, and mentions The Chancellors' Tales, the book in which Healey's lecture at LSE is highlighted, along with those of other former chancellors. 

The Times
We have never had a chancellor so good (29 Nov 06)
Article about a survey by The Political Studies Association looking at the success of chancellors. Recent holders of the post do not rate economic expertise highly, according to a collection of their views, The Chancellors' Tales, edited by Howard Davies.

Brunei Times
How independent should a central bank be? (22 Nov 06)
Article refers to the afterward by LSE director, Howard Davies in The Chancellors' Tales, in which he asks: 'Will Gordon Brown as prime minister be as happy with the implications of the new regime as he was as Chancellor - given that one consequence ... is the exclusion of the Prime Minister from influence over interest rate decisions?'

The Times
Never knowingly undertold
Review of The Chancellors' Tales: managing the British economy, which is edited by Howard Davies.

The Observer
The tottering pillar of wisdom (19 Nov 06)
Article refers to the afterward by LSE director, Howard Davies in The Chancellors' Tales, in which he asks: 'Will Gordon Brown as prime minister be as happy with the implications of the new regime as he was as Chancellor - given that one consequence ... is the exclusion of the Prime Minister from influence over interest rate decisions?' 

Financial Times
If economic policies could talk (31 Oct 06)
Article refers to The Chancellors' Tales. 'Sir Howard Davies, the director of LSE, had the ingenious idea of getting every chancellor from Denis Healey, to all but one of his Conservative successors - Howe, Lawson, Lamont and Clarke - to give an account of how they saw things. All the contributors, except Kenneth Clarke, have published their official memoirs and have thus felt free to let their hair down.'

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