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Trade and Inequality Revisited

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Professor Paul Krugman, Princeton University, will give a public lecture at LSE on Friday 4 May, entitled Trade and Inequality Revisited.

Manufactured imports from developing countries have risen sharply since the mid-90s, when the effects of trade on inequality were a major political issue. This lectures asks should we be reconsidering the link between globalisation and inequality?

Paul Krugman is one of the world's most famous living economists. As a researcher he invented the 'new trade theory' and won the John Bates Clark Medal for the best American economist under 40. He is a prolific author and writes a twice weekly column in the New York Times, he also holds a chair at Princeton.

Professor Tony Venables, LSE, will chair this event, which is in partnership with Palgrave Macmillan and marks the publication of Economics: European edition by Paul Krugman, Robin Wells and Kathryn Graddy.

Trade and Inequality Revisited is on Friday 4 May 2007 at 1-2pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A. This event is free and open to all but a ticket is required.

Ends

To request a press ticket, please contact Nadia Awad, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email pressoffice@lse.ac.uk| 

Note:

Professor Krugman will also deliver the James Mead Memorial Lecture at LSE on Thursday 14 June, speaking on Globalisation and Welfare.

Press cuttings

Guardian
Trading with China: Big countries, big worries (22 May)
Tony Blair may have vowed yesterday to get back on track the World Trade Organisation's latest negotiations, which began in Doha in 2001 and ran aground soon after, but he looks an increasingly lonely figure on the centre-left. The same shift is going on among America's intelligentsia. Paul Krugman, the economist who is to free trade what Nick Hornby is to football, recently told an audience at the LSE that he was having doubts. Why? 'China is really, really big.'

26 April 2007

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