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LSE announces the winners of the 2006 Lakatos Award

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The London School of Economics and Political Science announces that the 2006 Lakatos Award in Philosophy of Science, of £10,000 for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, has been jointly won by:

  • Harvey Brown for his book Physical Relativity: space-time structure from a dynamical perspective (Oxford University Press 2005), and
  • Hasok Chang for his book Inventing Temperature: measurement and scientific progress (Oxford University Press 2004)

The joint winners will visit LSE to receive their awards and give the award lectures on Wednesday 18 April 2007.

Dr Brown's book develops a critical account of the way that Einstein formulated his special theory of relativity, concentrating on a tension between its kinematical and dynamical aspects. It sheds new light on central issues such as the alleged conventionality of simultaneity and the relationships between the special and the general theory of relativity.

Dr Chang's book attacks the seemingly simple question 'What is temperature and how can we measure it?' He shows, however, that pursuing that question leads to new perspectives on a range of general issues about scientific reasoning and the authority of science.

The Lakatos Award is given for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, widely interpreted, in the form of a book published in English during the previous six years. It was made possible by a generous endowment from the Latsis Foundation. The award is in memory of the former LSE professor, Imre Lakatos, and is administered by an international Management Committee organised from the LSE.

The Committee decides the outcome of the award competition on the advice of an international, independent and anonymous panel of Selectors.

For more on the Lakatos Award, click here|

Ends

For further details of the nomination procedure or more information on the Lakatos Award 2007, contact Lisa Toseland on + 44 (0) 20 7955 7901, or email l.toseland@lse.ac.uk| 

More information on the events will be posted at www.lse.ac.uk/events| or contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060, email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes:

Past winners of the Lakatos Award include James Woodward (J.O. and Juliette Koepfli Professor of the Humanities, California Institute of Technology), for his book Making Things Happen: a theory of causal explanation in 2005; Kim Sterelny (Victoria University in Wellington), for his book Thought in a Hostile World: the evolution of human cognition, in 2004, and Patrick Suppes (Stanford University), for his book Representation and Invariance of Scientific Structures, 2003.

Nominations can now be made for the 2007 Lakatos Award, and must be received by Monday 23rd April 2007. The 2007 Award will be for a book published in English with an imprint from 2001-2006 inclusive. A book may, with the permission of the author, be nominated by any person of recognised standing within the profession.

For further details of the nomination procedure or more information on the Lakatos Award 2007, contact Lisa Toseland on + 44 (0) 20 7955 7901, or email l.toseland@lse.ac.uk| 

Imre Lakatos, who died in 1974 aged 51, had been professor of logic with special reference to the philosophy of mathematics at LSE since 1969. He joined the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method in 1960. Born in Hungary in 1922, he graduated (in Physics, Mathematics and Philosophy) from Debrecen University in 1944. He then joined the underground resistance. (His mother and grandmother perished in Auschwitz.) After the War, he was active in the Communist Party and had an influential position in the Ministry of Education. In 1950 he was arrested and spent the next three years as a political prisoner. After his release, he was given refuge in the Hungarian Academy of Science where he translated western works in science and mathematics into Hungarian. After the suppression of the Hungarian uprising he escaped to Vienna and from there, with the aid of a Rockefeller fellowship, on to Cambridge, England. He there wrote his (second) doctoral thesis out of which grew his famous Proofs and Refutations (CUP, 1976). Two volumes of Philosophical Papers, edited by John Worrall and Gregory Currie, appeared in 1978, also from CUP.

Press cuttings

Yonhap News, South Korea
South Korean professor wins Lakatos Award (22 March 07)
South Korean professor Chang Ha-sok has been selected as the co-winner of this year's Lakatos Award for his book Inventing Temperature: Measurement and Scientific Progress, the London School of Economics and Political Science announced. 

Ephilosopher.com
Lakatos Award 2006 (2 March 07)
The London School of Economics and Political Science announces that this year's Lakatos Award, of £10,000 for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, has been jointly won by: Harvey Brown and Hasok Chang.

2 March 2007

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