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Kuwait Foundation pledges £5.7 million for a new London School of Economics Professorship and research programme

A new Chair and research programme, the Kuwait Research Programme on Development, Governance and Globalisation in the Gulf States, is to be established at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

The endowed Professorship and the programme have been made possible thanks to a pledge of around £5.7 million over ten years by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences, formally agreed on 5 June.

The Kuwait Endowed Professorship of Economics and Political Science will be based in the School's Department of Economics|. The first holder of this Chair will be Professor Tim Besley| who will formally take up the position as the Kuwait Professor of Economics and Political Science later in 2007.

The research programme will be a ten year multidisciplinary global programme of mutual benefit to both organisations. The focus will include such topics as globalisation, economic development, diversification of and challenges facing resource rich economies, trade relations between the Gulf States and major trading partners, energy trading, security and migration.

This will be hosted in LSE's interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Global Governance|, and led by Professor David Held|, co-director of the Centre. It will support post-doctoral researchers and PhD students, develop academic networks between LSE and Gulf institutions, and host regular seminar series as well as five major biennial conferences.

The pledge will also support new Arabic editions of the widely read and influential texts, Global Civil Society Yearbook|, Global Transformations and The Global Transformations Reader, published through the Centre for the Study of Global Governance.

LSE Director Howard Davies said: 'We are very grateful to the Kuwait Foundation for this generous pledge. It is an opportunity for the School, our staff and students to broaden and deepen knowledge about Kuwait and the Gulf States.'

The Kuwait Research Programme on Development, Governance and Globalisation in the Gulf States will have a formal launch in autumn 2007.

Ends

Contact: Judith Higgin, LSE Press Office, on +44 (0)20 7955 7582, email: j.a.higgin@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes

The Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS) is a private, non-profit organisation, established by an Amiri Decree in 1976. KFAS is managed and administered by a Board of Directors, chaired by HH the Amir of the State of Kuwait. See http://www.kfas.com/|

Professor Tim Besley is currently Professor of Economics and Political Science at LSE where he is also director of the Suntory Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD). Professor Besley, and Professor Jordi Gali, CREI, were jointly awarded the Yrjö Jahnsson Award (YJA) in Economics in 2005. This award, made every second year to a European economist under 45, is the most prestigious award in European economics, and is the European equivalent of the American Clark medal. See http://econ.lse.ac.uk/staff/tbesley/index_own.html|

Professor David Held is Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science at LSE. Eighteen years ago he co-founded Polity, which is now a major presence in social science and humanities publishing. See http://www.lse.ac.uk/Depts/global/staffprofessorheld.htm|

LSE has around 54 undergraduates and 111 postgraduates from the Middle East within its 8,000 strong student community. The School is also in touch with around 1,400 alumni from Middle Eastern countries either living or working in the Middle East or in the UK.

LSE has strong connections with the Middle East through the work of academics in its Department of International Relations and Department of International History, Department of Government, Department of Anthropology, Department of Social Policy, the Centre for the Study of Global Governance, the Development Studies Institute and the Crisis States Research Centre.

11 June 2007

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