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High blood pressure will strike people in their 30s warns LSE academic

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The rate of uncontrolled high blood pressure may increase by 60 per cent over the next 20 years - potentially triggering a global epidemic of cardiovascular disease and affecting people as young as 30, according to a report released yesterday (Wednesday 18 April) by three international health experts.

The report, High Blood Pressure and Health Policy: where we are and where we need to go next, was launched at the European Parliament and calls for government and healthcare policy-makers to take action to manage the threat of high blood pressure.

The report's authors were Dr Panos Kanavos| of LSE's Department of Health and Social Policy, Dr Jan Östergren, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden and Michael A Weber, State University of New York. They concluded that, without increased emphasis on modifying lifestyles as well as diagnosing and treating high blood pressure, late 20th century gains in treating cardiovascular disease may stagnate or reverse.

Dr Kanavos, lecturer in International Health Policy in the Department of Social Policy and Merck Fellow in Pharmaceutical Economics at LSE Health and Social Care, said: 'High blood pressure is a condition whereby incidence increases with age, but this does not mean that it is a problem that only affects old people.

'A concerted public policy effort to prevent cardiovascular disease through more aggressive high blood pressure diagnosis, treatment of high blood pressure and its underlying causes, and monitoring will save productive lives and cut healthcare costs among adults in the prime of their lives' he added.

Ends

For a full copy of the press release and the report, please contact Rob Jones at Ruder Finn 020 7462 8962 or email rjones@ruderfinn.co.uk| 

Press Cuttings

Medical News Today
Global high blood pressure situation growing dire, but doesn't have to be, new health report says (18 May)
The report, High Blood Pressure and Health Policy: where we are and where we need to go next, examines the serious medical, economic and human health consequences of high blood pressure. 'High blood pressure contributes to disabling conditions such as kidney disease, stroke and cardiovascular disease, which increases demand for long- term medical care,' said report author Dr Panos Kanavos, LSE.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=71331| 

Category.net
Journée mondiale de l'Hypertension - rapport (17 May)
Article about the recent report into high blood pressure called High Blood Pressure and Health Policy: where we are and where we need to go next, which was co-authored by LSE's Dr Panos Kanavos.
http://www.categorynet.com/v2/content/view/45087/389/| 

Diet Nation
Poor diet, lack of exercise killing millions (16 May)
Over one billion people around the world suffer from high blood pressure, according to a Swedish study - even those in developing countries. Research conducted by the Karolinska University Hospital, along with the State University of New York and the London School of Economics, revealed that high blood pressure leads to other serious health conditions, such as heart disease, which kills millions of people each year.
http://www.dietnation.com/blogs/dietnation_kristines_diet_dish/|
archive/2007/05/15/poor-diet-lack-of-exercise-killing-millions.aspx| 

Daily Mail
A jab that will cure high blood pressure (11 May)
Last month experts from the London School of Economics warned that the stress of modern life could be spawning an epidemic of heart disease, with half of Britons suffering from high blood pressure by 2025.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/|
health/healthmain.html?in_article_id=454296&in_page_id=1774| 

Evening Standard
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23395954-|
details/A+jab+that+will+cure+high+blood+pressure/article.do| 

BBC News
Modern life puts stress on heart (20 April)
The stress of everyday life threatens to fuel an epidemic of cardiovascular disease, a report warns. Researcher Dr Panos Kanavos, of the London School of Economics, said it was wrong to think that high blood pressure only affected older people.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6574757.stm|

Independent
High-stress lifestyles threaten heart disease epidemic
Article about recent report High Blood Pressure and Health Policy, co-authored by Dr Panos Kanavos, report co-author and lecturer in International Health Policy in the Department of Social Policy and Merck Fellow in Pharmaceutical Economics at LSE Health and Social Care.
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health_medical/article2465968.ece| 

Also in

Channel 4 News
Life stress 'a silent killer' (19 April)
Article about a new report, High Blood Pressure and Health Policy: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go Next, which was unveiled at the European Parliament in Brussels. One of the report's authors, Dr Panos Kanavos of the London School of Economics, commented: 'High blood pressure is a condition whereby incidence increases with age, but this does not mean that it is a problem that only affects old people.'
http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/society/health/life+stress+a+silent+killer/446397| 

Medical News Today
New health report exposes serious social and economic implications of emerging global high blood pressure crisis (18 April)
The rate of uncontrolled high blood pressure may increase by 60 percent over the next two decades1,2 and potentially trigger a global epidemic of cardiovascular disease, according to a report released today by three international health experts. The report, High Blood Pressure and Health Policy: where we are and where we need to go next, was written by Dr Panos Kanavos, LSE.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=68207| 

Metro
Stress gives 40pc of us high blood pressure
More than four in ten adults may be suffering high blood pressure brought on by stress. The figure is set to reach six in ten by 2025 unless action is taken now, researchers warn. Article includes comments from Dr Panos Kanavos, report co-author and lecturer in International Health Policy in the Department of Social Policy and Merck Fellow in Pharmaceutical Economics at LSE Health and Social Care.
http://www.metro.co.uk/news/article.html?in_article_id=45977&in_page_id=34| 

19 April 2007

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