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More or less regulation?

The winter 2007 issue of Risk&Regulation, the magazine of the Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation| (CARR) is now out.

In the latest issue, CARR director Bridget Hutter discusses the difficulties for regulators of balancing different interests in risk regulation in a changing world.

Professor Hutter's article is online at:
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/riskAndRegulationMagazine/magazine/|
winter2007/editorial.htm|

As recent events in the financial markets have revealed, consumer understandings of risk and their levels of financial knowledge can leave them vulnerable and ill-equipped in their panic.

  • In 'Talking Point', representatives from the Institute of Directors and National Consumer Council highlight some of the costs and benefits of regulatory interventions.
  • Former chair of the Health and Safety Commission, Sir Bill Callaghan, reflects upon the importance of being a firm but fair regulator, when confronted with both traditional and 'new' risks.

Another central theme is the increasing use of quantification and performance measurement in risk regulation regimes.

  • In 'The risks of regulating by numbers', Peter Miller and Liisa Kurunmäki consider whether regulating health care through statistics create risks and come at the expense of patient choice.
  • Gwyn Bevan and Jocelyn Cornwall consider a strategy of targeted and proportionate regulation as a possible regulatory solution to the failure of professional self-regulation in the NHS.

This issue of Risk&Regulation considers the behavioural effects of different performance regimes in both the public and private sectors on organizations and their customers.

Click here| to download a PDF of the latest issue.

Ends

Contact: Amy Greenwood, CARR, on 020 7849 4635 or at risk@lse.ac.uk|.

Notes

About CARR [Analysis of risk and regulation|]
The ESRC Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation (CARR) is an interdisciplinary research centre at London School of Economics and Political Science. Our core intellectual work focuses on the organisational and institutional settings for risk management and regulatory practices.

About ESRC [www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk|]
The ESRC is the UK's largest funding agency for research and postgraduate training relating to social and economic issues. It provides independent, high quality, relevant research to business, the public sector and Government. At any one time the ESRC supports over 4,000 researchers and postgraduate students in academic institutions and research policy institutes.

29 November 2007

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