Home > News and media > News > News archive > 2006 > The United Nations at 60 - relic or relevant?

 

The United Nations at 60 - relic or relevant?

Page Contents >

Click here to download a transcript of the lecture and Q&A session given by Dr Kim Howells| (PDF)

Photograph of Dr Kim Howells MPThe first session of the UN general assembly was held in London 60 years ago in January 1946. To mark this anniversary, LSE is hosting a series of public lectures looking at the work of the United Nations and the challenges that it faces. Dr Kim Howells MP, minister of state at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office with responsibility for the UN and UN reform, will begin the series with a lecture on The UN's Role in a Revitalised Multilateral System, on Monday 9 October.

The lecture will outline the British Government's objectives for a United Nations better equipped to face the challenges of the 21st century. Dr Howells will explore how we can best support the United Nations, strengthen consensus and modernise the structures of the organisation so that it can engage with maximum impact where we need it to.

Dr Kim Howells was appointed minister of state at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in May 2005. He is responsible for the Middle East, Afghanistan and South Asia, Counter Narcotics, Counter Proliferation, Counter Terrorism, UN and UN Reform.

Other speakers in the series are:

  • Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, minister of foreign affairs of the Republic of South Africa
  • Judge Rosalyn Higgins, president of the International Court of Justice
  • Sir Richard Jolly, former assistant secretary general of the United Nations and co-director of the UN Intellectual History Project
  • Edwin Feulner, president of the Heritage Foundation.

The United Nations at 60 - relic or relevant? is hosted jointly by LSE's Centre for the Study of Global Governance, Development Studies Institute, International Relations department and the Ralph Miliband Programme and supported by LSE's Annual Fund.

The UN's Role in a Revitalised Multilateral System is on Monday 9 October at 6.30-8pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A. This event is free and open to all with no ticket required.

Ends

To reserve a press seat, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes:

LSE lecture series: The United Nations at 60 - relic or relevant? continues with:

  • Wednesday 25 October, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre, Old Building
    The United Nations in the 21st Century: a perspective from a developing country
    SPEAKER: Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma is minister of foreign affairs of the Republic of South Africa.
  • Monday 13 November, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre, Old Building
    The ICJ, the United Nations System and the Rule of Law
    SPEAKER: Judge Rosalyn Higgins is president of the International Court of Justice.
  • Tuesday 21 November, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre, Old Building
    Power without Glory: UN contributions to economic and social thinking and practice
    SPEAKER: Sir Richard Jolly was former assistant secretary general of the United Nations and is co-director of the UN Intellectual History Project.
  • Thursday 30 November, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre, Old Building
    Real Reform at the United Nations
    SPEAKER: Edwin Feulner is president of the Heritage Foundation.

Press cuttings

A report from Dr Kim Howells lecture at LSE on Monday 9 October was broadcast on the BBC World Service on Sunday 15 October.

posted 28 September 2006

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|