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Modern New Zealand in a changing world

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Photograph of the Rt Hon Helen Clark MPThe Rt Hon Helen Clark MP, prime minister of New Zealand, will give a public lecture at LSE on Friday 10 November.

The prime minister will speak on modern New Zealand, a small modern economy that has achieved record surpluses and the lowest unemployment in the OECD. What are the social and economic initiatives undertaken by the government that the prime minister has led into a historic third term?

Click here to download a transcript of this event| (PDF)

The Rt Hon Helen Clark was elected prime minister of New Zealand in November 1999 and in 2005 she became the first New Zealand Labour Party leader to take the party into three consecutive election victories. Since entering Parliament in 1981 Miss Clark has held a number of ministerial portfolios, including conservation, housing, labour and health and in 1986 was awarded the annual Peace Prize of the Danish Peace Foundation for her work in promoting peace and disarmament. The prime minister also currently serves as minister of arts, culture and heritage.

Professor Paul Johnson, LSE, will chair this event.

Modern New Zealand in a changing world is on Friday 10 November 2006 at 1-2pm in the Shaw Library, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A. This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required. Tickets have now all been allocated for this event but a returns queue will be in operation on the night. Click here| for more details

Ends

  • General tickets: Tickets have now all been allocated for this event but a returns queue will be in operation on the night. Click here for more details
  • Press tickets: To request a press ticket, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk 

Press cuttings

Scoop, New Zealand
Modern New Zealand in a Changing World (12 Nov 06)
Prime Minister Helen Clark addresses the London School of Economics.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA0611/S00207.htm| 

3 November 2006

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