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Professor Emeritus Lord Layard to chair The Good Childhood Inquiry

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Professor Emeritus Lord Layard|, founder director of LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, will chair a new inquiry into childhood for The Children's Society.

The Good Childhood Inquiry will be the UK's first independent national inquiry into childhood and aims to renew society's understanding of childhood for the 21st century, to inform, improve and inspire all our relationships with children. The inquiry will:

  • Listen to the voices and views of children, young people and adults about their experience and understanding of childhood in the UK today.
  • Identify and address important issues that face children and young people in the UK today
  • Make recommendations to improve the way in which childhood is experienced and understood in the UK today.

Click here for more information on The Good Childhood Inquiry| 

Ends

Press cuttings

Independent on Sunday
UK children the unhappiest in Europe, says study
(10 Sep 06)
Britain's 12 million children and teenagers are the unhappiest and unhealthiest of any wealthy European country, a major new study has revealed. These findings are seen as evidence for an independent inquiry into what makes a good childhood, being launched next week by the Government's 'happiness tsar', the economist Lord Layard.
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1433394.ece| 

The Guardian
Ins and outs (26 July 06)
Richard Layard, emeritus professor of economics at the LSE and also a government adviser on mental health issues, will chair the first independent national inquiry into childhood in the UK, managed by the Children's Society. 

Daily Mail
Children facing a wealth of problems (25 July 06)
Lord Layard, Emeritus Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics, said with regard to child poverty in Britain: 'Our wealth as a society has clearly not bought us the kind of childhood we want for our children.'

The Times
Children 'too old for fun, too young to face future' (24 July 06)
Richard Layard, Emeritus Professor of Economics at LSE said that teenagers were becoming increasingly isolated from the rest of society and engaging in a culture in which adults were peripheral. 'It is as if they are living in a separate country from the rest of us. They do not emerge until some time in their early 20s, when they get a job and become dependent on other adults for approval.' 

The Press & Journal
Two-year study of childhood launched
(24 July 06)
Lord Layard of the London School of Economics will chair the Good Childhood Inquiry, which is a major study aiming to reveal and address the important issues that children in Britain are facing today.

Yorkshire Post
Inquiry aims for 'new vision' of childhood (24 July 06)

Independent
Stop! How well do you know your children? (23 July 06)
A wide-ranging inquiry into the true state of childhood in Britain today is to be launched this week, under the leadership of the eminent economist and 'happiness' tsar, Lord Layard. A panel of experts and religious leaders will take evidence from every sector of society in an attempt to understand what is seen as an increasingly pressured and complex world for the nation's 12 million children.
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1191959.ece| 

Press Association
National study aims to understand issues facing youngsters (23 July 06)
A major independent study which will focus on all aspects of childhood was heralded today as an 'important and ambitious' project by its chairman. Lord Layard, Emeritus professor of economics at LSE, said the inquiry was an opportunity to 'focus positively'' on the formative years of life, counter balancing 'negative perceptions'. The national study aims to understand and address the issues facing youngsters, making recommendations to create a 'new vision' of childhood. It will look at a series of issues from mental health problems and changing family situations like one-parent households, to society's perception of young people.

 

 posted 24 July 2006

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