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The Chancellors' Tales - managing the British economy

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LSE director Howard Davies will mark the launch of the new publication The Chancellors' Tales - managing the British economy with a public debate on Wednesday 15 November at LSE. Joining Howard Davies to discuss the issues raised in the book are Lord Burns, Robert Chote, Howard Davies, Professor Charles Goodhart, William Keegan, George Osborne MP.

This new publication tells the story of how the British economy has been managed over the last 30 years, offering a unique insider view of the management of a modern economy and charting the opportunities and constraints that each chancellor faced. The book provides a rare historical record of the difficulties and dilemmas of managing the British economy in an increasingly global age.

The story is told by those who should know more about it than anyone else - the former chancellors of the Exchequer in both Labour and Conservative administrations. The chapters are written by Lord Healey, Lord Howe, Lord Lawson of Blaby, Lord Lamont and Kenneth Clarke MP. The book also contains an introduction by Howard Davies, Director of LSE. Click here for more on The Chancellors' Tales - Managing the British Economy|

  • Lord Burns has been chairman of Abbey plc since 2002. He is also chairman of Glas Cymru Ltd (Welsh Water) and a non-executive director of Pearson Group plc and British Land plc.
  • Robert Chote was appointed director of the Institute of Fiscal Studies in October 2002. He is a governor of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research and served as a member of the Statistics Advisory Committee of the Office for National Statistics.
  • Charles Goodhart, CBE, FBA is an emeritus professor of banking and finance in the Financial Markets Group at LSE.
  • William Keegan is an associate editor and senior economics commentator of The Observer newspaper. He was previously with the Bank of England's Economic Intelligence Department and before that was economics correspondent of the Financial Times.
  • George Osborne is the member of Parliament for Tatton, Cheshire, and the shadow chancellor of the Exchequer.

The Chancellors' tales - managing the British economy is on Wednesday 15 November 2006 at 6.30pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A. This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required. One ticket per person can be requested from 10am on Monday 6 November. Click here for more details on how to obtain a ticket|

Ends

Press cuttings

Computing
Talking outsourcing - blog (5 Dec 06)
A regular column by LSE PhD student Mark Kobayashi-Hillary. He refers to the School event The Chancellors' Tales - managing the British economy, held on Wednesday 15 November to launch a book of the same title, edited by director Howard Davies.

Observer
The old bruiser who remained the boy next door (4 Dec 06)
William Keegan interviews Denis Healey, and mentions The Chancellors' Tales, the book in which Healey's lecture at LSE is highlighted, along with those of other former chancellors. 

The Times
We have never had a chancellor so good (29 Nov 06)
Article about a survey by The Political Studies Association looking at the success of chancellors. Recent holders of the post do not rate economic expertise highly, according to a collection of their views, The Chancellors' Tales, edited by Howard Davies.

Brunei Times
How independent should a central bank be? (22 Nov 06)
Article refers to the afterward by LSE director, Howard Davies in The Chancellors' Tales, in which he asks: 'Will Gordon Brown as prime minister be as happy with the implications of the new regime as he was as Chancellor - given that one consequence ... is the exclusion of the Prime Minister from influence over interest rate decisions?'

The Times
Never knowingly undertold
Review of The Chancellors' Tales: managing the British economy, which is edited by Howard Davies.

The Observer
The tottering pillar of wisdom (19 Nov 06)
Article refers to the afterward by LSE director, Howard Davies in The Chancellors' Tales, in which he asks: 'Will Gordon Brown as prime minister be as happy with the implications of the new regime as he was as Chancellor - given that one consequence ... is the exclusion of the Prime Minister from influence over interest rate decisions?' 

Financial Times
If economic policies could talk (31 Oct 06)
Article refers to The Chancellors' Tales. 'Sir Howard Davies, the director of LSE, had the ingenious idea of getting every chancellor from Denis Healey, to all but one of his Conservative successors - Howe, Lawson, Lamont and Clarke - to give an account of how they saw things. All the contributors, except Kenneth Clarke, have published their official memoirs and have thus felt free to let their hair down.'

Updated 2 November (30 October) 2006

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