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What is the place of Islam in non-Islamic societies?

Islamic scholar Tariq Ramadan is to give a public lecture in London on Thursday 15 September on how Muslims can live an authentic life within the predominantly non-Muslim societies of the west.

The lecture is the second in a series of joint lectures by the Young Foundation and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). The lecture will take place at LSE.

Tariq Ramadan was named by Time magazine in 2000 as one of the 100 most important innovators of the coming century. He is soon to be a senior research fellow at the Lokahi Foundation in London and a visiting fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford.

The grandson of Hassan al-Banna, a founder of the Muslim Brotherhood, Ramadan's main concern has been to show that Islam can be part of modernity, not opposed to it, and to set out how Muslims can live an authentic life within the predominantly non-Muslim societies of the west. In a recent BBC Radio 4 Today programme interview, talking about the London bombings, he absolutely condemned the taking of innocent life. His work has provided a rare space for dialogue on issues as varied as tolerance and consumerism.

The lecture takes place on Thursday 15 September at 6.30pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE. The event is free and open to all, however a ticket is required. Most tickets have been allocated but students can still pick up a ticket from the LSESU. A returns queue will be in operation before the event. Click here| for more information.

Ends

  • General public: Most tickets have been allocated but students can still pick up a ticket from the LSESU. A returns queue will be in operation before the event. Click here for more information.
  • Press tickets: To request a press ticket, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.Winterstein@lse.ac.uk Please note that tickets are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Notes:

The Young Foundation, which is being launched this autumn, is a unique organisation that undertakes research to identify and understand social needs then develops practical initiatives and institutions to address them. More information about The Young Foundation can be found at www.youngfoundation.org.uk|

The joint LSE/Young Foundation public lecture series begins with a lecture by social scientist Professor Charles Tilley on Why Do Things Happen: from 9/11 to urban riots on Thursday 8 September, see Public Events|

It is followed by Professor Arlie Hochschild, University of California, Berkeley on The Commercialisation of Intimate Life on Thursday 20 September at LSE, see Public Events|

For a recent BBC interview with Tariq Ramadan, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4714101.stm|

5 September 2005

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