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Robert Tavernor appointed professor of urban design and director of LSE Cities Programme

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The School is pleased to announce that Professor Robert Tavernor, currently professor of architecture and head of the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering at Bath University, has been appointed professor of urban design and director of LSE Cities Programme, based within LSE's Sociology Department. He will take up his post on 1 April 2005. 

Professor Tavernor studied architecture in London, the British School at Rome, and St John's College Cambridge University, where he graduated with a PhD and as a registered architect in 1985. He was appointed Forbes professor of architecture at the University of Edinburgh in 1992, professor of architecture at Bath in 1995, and head of Department in 2003. He was visiting professor to the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, in 1998; European Union visiting scholar at Texas A&M in 2002; and visiting professor to the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil (FAU/USP). 

Amongst his books are Palladio and Palladianism (1991, Thames & Hudson), and On Alberti and the Art of Building' (1998, Yale UP), and he is co-editor of Body and Building: on the changing relation of body and architecture (2002, MIT Press).  

Professor Tavernor takes up the post vacated by Ricky Burdett.

Press cuttings

Guardian
Grand designs (25 Jan 05)
Richard Burdett, has been made centennial professor in architecture and urbanism. It is the LSE's first ever professorship in the field of urban design, and comes as Professor Burdett steps down as founding director of the LSE Cities Programme. Robert Tavernor, at present professor of architecture and head of the department of architecture and civil engineering at Bath University, will replace him in that role and also become professor of urban design.

17 January 2005

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