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Human Rights Day balloon debate - who is the greatest of the 20th century?

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Who do you think is the greatest human rights personality of modern times? The Centre for the Study of Human Rights| at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) hosts a balloon debate to mark human rights day on Thursday 8 December.

Six human rights personalities, living or dead, will be in the balloon but there is only air to support one. Five have to go. Each will have his or her case put by a spokesperson, explaining why he or she is truly the greatest and should be allowed to stay while all the rest should be ejected. The audience will then make the choice as to who is truly the greatest human rights person of the 20th century, with a final playoff between the two most popular personalities.  

The human rights personalities in the balloon, and the speakers arguing their cases, are:

  • Mahatma Gandhi: Professor Peter Townsend, Centre for the Study of Human Rights
  • Martin Luther King: Shami Chakrabarti, director, Liberty 
  • Nelson Mandela: Professor Francesca Klug, Centre for the Study of Human Rights
  • George Orwell: Professor Conor Gearty, Centre for the Study of Human Rights
  • Eleanor Roosevelt: Jonathan Cooper, Doughty Street Chambers
  • Josef Stalin: Andrew Puddephatt, Visiting Fellow, Centre for the Study of Human Rights

Professor Laurie Taylor, Birkbeck College and currently presenter of Thinking Allowed, BBC Radio 4, will chair this debate.

The Human Rights Day balloon debate is on Thursday 8 December at 6.30pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A. The event is free and open to all with no ticket required.

Ends

To reserve a press seat or for more information, contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.Winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes:

For details of other events organised by the Centre for the Study of Human Rights see http://www.lse.ac.uk/Depts/human-rights/| 

Press cuttings

THES
Uncle Joe's less obvious legacy to the oppressed, p18-19 (2 Dec 05)
Could Stalin possibly have been the instigator of the human rights movement? Andrew Puddephatt, former director of Liberty and visiting fellow at LSE's Centre for the Study of Human Rights, consider how the dictator might argue his case. Reference to the human rights balloon debate on who is the greatest human rights personality of modern times takes place at LSE on Thursday 8 December.  

28 November 2005

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