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LSE German Symposium 2005

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Dr Rolf-E Breuer, president of the German Banking Association and chairman and former CEO of Deutsche Bank AG, will speak on the Future of the German Banking Sector, on Monday 7 February at LSE.

The lecture marks the start of the LSE German Symposium 2005, which runs from Monday 7 to Friday 11 February. The symposium features events on a range of topics from the European capital markets to market-based approaches to health policy and a look at Afghanistan.

Monday 7 February

  • The Future of the German Banking Sector. Dr Rolf-E Breuer, president of the German Banking Association and chairman and former CEO of Deutsche Bank AG. 5pm, D202, Clement House, LSE.
  • Market-based Approaches to Health Policy. Ulla Schmidt, German minister of health and social security. 7pm, New Theatre, East Building, LSE.

Tuesday 8 February

  • Corporate Restructuring: is Germany losing its competitive edge? Dr Burkhard Schwenker, CEO of Roland Berger Strategy Consultants. 2pm, Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.
  • Corporate Governance in Germany: current changes from an international perspective. Professor Dr Annette Köhler, Leipzig Graduate School of Management. 6pm, New Theatre, East Building.

Wednesday 9 February

  • Tea With the Devil - Afghanistan between hope and abyss. Dr Reinhard Erös, head of German Aid for Aghan Children. 5pm, H203, Connaught House, LSE.
  • Innovations as Success Factor in an International Economy. Dr Michael Träm, CEO or AT Kearney Central Europe. 6pm, D302, Clement House, LSE.

Thursday 10 February

  • Security Policy in the Age of Globalisation. Nikolaus Schmeja, Obserst a D, former colonel in the Germany military. 3pm, H102, Connaught House, LSE
  • Financial Centre Frankfurt - forever second to the city? Panel discussion with: Professor Dr Norbert Walter, chief economist of Deutsche Bank AG; Hans Peters, CEO of Peters Associates; Andrew Gowers, chief editor of the Financial Times; Colin T Roy, CEO of Greenhill Germany. 6.30pm, D602, Clement House, LSE.

Friday 11 February

  • European Capital Markets. Carsten Kengeter, partner and co-head of fixed income sales Europe at Goldman Sachs. 4pm, Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.
  • Impact of International Accounting on the German Economy. Professor Dr Wolfgang Grewe, member global executive, chairman and managing partner Europe, Middle East and Africa of Deloitte. 6pm, D302, Clement House, LSE

Additionally, the LSE underground bar will turn into London's own Oktoberfest on Friday 11 February, from 8pm-2am.

All the events scheduled for the German Symposium 2005 are free and open to all but a ticket is required. Tickets will be available from 10am on Monday 31 January at Houghton Street or email su.soc.german@lse.ac.uk| 

A full schedule is online at the LSE German Society's webpage: www.lsegs.de| 

Ends

Members of the press: for more information or to reserve a seat for any of the above events, please email su.soc.german@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes

These events are organized by the LSESU German Society, which is sponsored by: Boston Consulting Group, Bertelsmann, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs and Greenhill.

Press cuttings

Süddeutsche Zeitung
P 26. Börse und finanzen (9 Feb 05)
Reference to Rolf Breuer, speaking at LSE
No direct link

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
P 19. Börsen Notizen; 'Londons Börse ist schwach'
No direct link

Financial Times
Euronext sets out its stall for LSE move (9 Feb 05)
The battle to create Europe's leading exchange soured earlier this week when Rolf Breuer, chairman of Deutsche Börse, told a gathering of students at the London School of Economics that 'the LSE is not the best at profitability'. 
http://news.ft.com/cms/s/a37e713e-7a6a-11d9-a8c9-00000e2511c8.html| 

Deutsche Börse chairman snipes at LSE (8 Feb 05)
Rolf Breuer, chairman of Deutsche Börse, on Monday belittled the London Stock Exchange, even though he is leading a controversial £1.3bn proposed bid for the institution. In remarks to students at the London School of Economics, Mr Breuer said the London Stock Exchange was weaker than its Frankfurt- and Paris-based counterparts, Deutsche Börse and Euronext, which are rivals in the planned bidding contest.
http://news.ft.com/cms/s/cec827f8-7976-11d9-89c5-00000e2511c8.html| 

28 January 2005

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