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Election debates at LSE: What Has Labour Done For Us? and What Difference Would the Conservatives Make?

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On Monday 25 April and Tuesday 3 May, LSE academics debate the legacy of Labour and what alternatives the Conservatives might offer at two election debates, both chaired by Howard Davies and open to all.

On Monday 25 April, Professors Nicholas Barr, Nicholas Crafts [updated 14 April], John Gray and John Hills will consider the record of the Blair administration. Has the government delivered on its promises of 1997 and 2001? The event will be chaired by LSE Director Howard Davies.

  • Nicholas Barr is professor of public economics at LSE, the author of numerous books and articles on the economics of the welfare state and the finance of higher education. He has been active in the UK debate on higher education since 1988, advocating a wide- ranging system of income-contingent student loans.
  • Nicholas FR Crafts is professor of economic history at LSE and is an expert in comparative economic growth and the development of the British economy in the last 200 years. 
  • John Gray is professor of European thought at LSE.
  • John Hills is professor of social policy at LSE and director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE). Professor Hills has research interests in income distribution and the welfare state, social security, housing, taxation and pensions. His current research projects include an examination of short-term movements in incomes (from week-to-week); a study of the impact of New Labour's reforms intended to reduce poverty and social exclusion; an analysis of the data on attitudes to poverty, social security and inequality; and an examination of the future of social insurance in the UK.

This debate takes place at 6.30pm in the Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE. For ticket information, click here|

Following this, on Tuesday 3 May Professor Alan Manning [updated 20 April], Professor Kenneth Minogue, Professor Tim Newburn and Dr Alan Sked will discuss whether the Conservative Party has campaigned with a set of policies that offer a credible alternative to the Labour Party.

  • Alan Manning is professor of economics at LSE
  • Tim Newburn is professor of criminology and social policy, LSE, and director of LSE's Mannheim Centre for the Study of Criminology and Criminal Justice.
  • Professor Kenneth Minogue is emeritus professor of political science.
  • Dr Alan Sked is a senior lecturer in international history.

This debate also takes place at 6.30pm in the Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE. For ticket information, click here|

Ends

Ticket information

Members of the public: These events are free and open to all but a ticket is required.

Media: To request a press ticket, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.Winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

12 April 2005

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