Home > News and media > News > News archive > 2005 > Chairman of the US Securities and Exchange Commission to speak at LSE

 

Chairman of the US Securities and Exchange Commission to speak at LSE

Page Contents >

Tuesday 25 January, 1.30pm
Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

William H Donaldson, chairman of the US Securities and Exchange Commission, will give a public lecture at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) on Tuesday 25 January. He will speak on US Capital Markets in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley World: why our markets should matter to foreign issuers

William H Donaldson became the 27th chairman of the US Securities and Exchange Commission on 18 February 2003. As chairman, Mr Donaldson oversees the regulation of US securities markets, ensures compliance with and enforcement of securities laws, and ensures the protection of investors' interests.

Mr Donaldson arrived at the Commission with more than 50 years experience working at the highest levels of business, government and academia. He served as chairman and CEO of the investment banking firm Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette, which he co-founded in 1959, chairman and CEO of the New York Stock Exchange, president and CEO of Aetna, and chairman and CEO of Donaldson Enterprises Inc, which he founded in 1981.

US Capital Markets in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley World: why our markets should matter to foreign issuers is on Tuesday 25 January at 1.30pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A. 

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required.

Ends

Members of the press: To reserve a seat, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.Winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Transcript

To read a transcript of this lecture, click here|

Press cuttings

Accountancy Age
A shift in US foreign policy (4 Feb 05)
During a speech at LSE, William Donaldson, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, made several concessions to UK and European companies listed in the US that are currently struggling with the rather heavy burden of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Former Financial Services Authority chairman and director of the LSE, Howard Davies, believes small companies with a small US shareholding may find it advantageous to leave.

17 January 2005

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|