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Britain in 2005 - is there any access to justice for asylum seekers and migrants?

In 2004, the government made drastic cuts to legal aid for asylum and immigration work. A year on, many legal practitioners have stopped doing publicly funded work and many asylum seekers and migrants are unable to find legal representation.

Sarah Cutler from Bail for Immigration Detainees and Maurice Wren from Asylum Aid will launch a dossier on how these cuts have affected aid for asylum seekers and migrants on Thursday 28 April at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

The speakers will highlight how the denial of effective legal advice and representation for these vulnerable groups amounts to a charter for discrimination and they will also consider the next steps in the campaign to reinstate access to justice

Professor Lydia Morris, a visiting fellow at LSE's Centre for the Study of Human Rights, will chair this event.

Britain in 2005 - is there any access to justice for asylum seekers and migrants? is on Thursday 28 April at 1.15pm in D302, Clement House, LSE, Aldwych, London WC2A. This event is free and open to all with no ticket required.

Ends

To reserve a press seat for this event, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.Winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes:

The charities Bail for Immigration Detainees and Asylum Aid have been collecting evidence about the impact of the cuts around the country; this event will launch a dossier on the subject based on over 70 submissions. For more information on the dossier, email dossier@asylumaid.org.uk| or contact Sarah Cutler (020 7247 3590) or Maurice Wren (020 7377 5123).

This event is organised by LSE's Centre for the Study of Human Rights|

For more information on Asylum Aid, see www.asylumaid.org.uk| 
For more information on Bail for Immigration Detainees, see: www.biduk.org| 

15 April 2005

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