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Women in the economy

MPs Harriet Harman and Eleanor Laing, Professor Susan Himmelweit (Open University) and Rachel Lomax (Bank of England) will discuss women in the economy in a public lecture at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) on Tuesday 16 November.

The proportion of women in paid employment has risen very significantly, as has the number achieving high profile positions in business and contributing at high level to the development of economic policy.

The panel will ask what has changed for women and what has remained the same? Are women now reaching the top of their organisations, or does the glass ceiling still remain? What lies behind gender segregation in employment, and why does 'women's work' still attract lesser monetary rewards? And is there a danger that the low paid care work of some women is sustaining the long hours and financial success of others?

  • Harriet Harman has been a member of the UK parliament for over 20 years and is at present solicitor general. She has held Labour front-bench posts in Social Services, Health and Social Security.
  • Susan Himmelweit is a professor of economics at the Open University and a member of the International Association for Feminist Economics.
  • Eleanor Laing is Conservative shadow minister for economic affairs and women.
  • Rachel Lomax is deputy governor of the Bank of England and a member of the Monetary Policy Committee.

Dr Diane Perrons, director of LSE's Gender Institute, will chair this event.

Women in the Economy is on Tuesday 16 November at 6.30pm in the Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE, Aldwych, London WC2A. This event is free and open to all with no ticket required.

Ends

To reserve a press seat, please contact Jessica Winterstein, LSE Press Office, on 020 7955 7060 or email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes:

This LSE Gender Institute lecture series continues with a debate on Women in the Media with Jana Bennett, director of television, BBC, and Professor Jenny Kitzinger, Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Cardiff University on Monday 22 November. More details are online at www.lse.ac.uk/events| 

9 November 2004

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