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The European Convention on Human Rights - still of relevance?

Since the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms came into force, it seems to have gone from strength to strength. But what is the true record of the Convention and do the rights that it sets out still have relevance today? Does the European Convention on Human Rights have a contribution to make to the global society in which we now live? 

Professor Brian Simpson, University of Michigan Law School, will address the subject of the European Convention on Thursday 16 October at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

A W Brian Simpson is the Charles F and Edith J Clyne Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the British Academy and has held professorships at the University of Kent and at the University of Chicago. His publications include Human Rights and the End of Empire: Britain and the genesis of the European Convention; Cannibalism and the Common Law and In the Highest Degree Odious: detention without trial in wartime Britain.

Professor Conor Gearty, Rausing director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, LSE, will chair this event.

The European Convention Fifty Years On is on Thursday 16 October at 6pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton St, London. This event is free and open to all with no ticket required.

Ends

To reserve a press seat, please contact Jessica Winterstein on 020 7955 7060 or email j.Winterstein@lse.ac.uk|

Notes:

The Centre for the Study of Human Rights
Launched in autumn 2000 the Centre for the Study of Human Rights draws upon LSE's considerable expertise and resources in the social sciences to develop its programmes of teaching, research and outreach in the field of human rights. For more information, visit http://www.lse.ac.uk/Depts/human-rights/|

10 October 2003

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