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Governor Bernanke to speak at LSE on Federal Reserve Policies

What impact have Federal Reserve policies had on stock and bond markets and what lessons can be learnt for US monetary policy today?

Ben S Bernanke, member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, will be speaking on Monetary Policy and Financial Markets at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) on Thursday 9 October.

He will look at recent research on the impact of Federal Reserve policies on the stock and bond markets and attempt to draw some lessons for current US policies.

Ben S Bernanke took office as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in 2002. Prior to this, he was the Howard Harrison and Gabrielle Snyder Beck Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University (1996-2002) and had served as a professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton since 1985.

Monetary Policy and Financial Markets is on Thursday 9 October at 6pm in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE, Houghton St, London WC2A 2AE.

This event is free and open to all but a ticket is required. Members of the public can request tickets by calling Conferences and Events on 020 7955 6100 or visiting www.lse.ac.uk/events|

Ends

To reserve a press ticket, contact Jessica Winterstein on 020 7955 7060 or email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes for editors:

This event is co-organised by The Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) at LSE, the Bank of England and the Department of Economics, LSE.

The Federal Reserve is the central bank of the United States, founded by Congress in 1913 to provide the nation with a safer, more flexible, and more stable monetary and financial system.

Today the Federal Reserve's duties fall into four general areas: (1) conducting the nation's monetary policy; (2) supervising and regulating banking institutions and protecting the credit rights of consumers; (3) maintaining the stability of the financial system; and (4) providing certain financial services to the US government, the public, financial institutions, and foreign official institutions.

3 October 2003

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