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Suspects and Secrets: surveillance after 11 September

Wednesday 6 November, 1.15pm
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House 
 

The aftermath of terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001 included the widespread tightening of surveillance in a number of countries.

The responses put several things in perspective:

  • That it is premature to see decentralised and commercial surveillance simply supplanting nation-state power, rather, the nation-state now draws upon an augmented surveillant assemblage for its own purposes
  • that reliance on high tech surveillance methods is undaunted by the low-tech attacks or the failure of high tech security systems already in place, and while they may not work to curb terrorism they are likely to impede civil rights for citizens who will be even more profiled and screened
  • and that the struggle to make mushrooming surveillance systems more democratically accountable and amenable to ethical scrutiny is being set back by panic regimes following September 11.

Professor David Lyon, Professor of Sociology at Queen's University, Kingston Ontario, will be addressing such topics in a lecture entitled Suspects and Secrets: surveillance after 11 September on Wednesday 6 November at LSE.

This event is free and open to all. No ticket is required.

Ends

To reserve a press seat, contact Jessica Winterstein on 020 7955 7060 or email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

Notes:

David Lyon is Professor of Sociology at Queen's University, Kingston Ontario. Author of several books on the sociology of surveillance, including most recently Surveillance as Social Sorting: privacy, risk and digital discrimination (editor, Routledge, 2002), and the forthcoming Surveillance after September 11 (Polity, 2003). Professor Lyon has also written extensively on postmodernity, religion and the internet.

1 November 2002

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