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Ground Zero: the rebuilding of an American city

Tuesday 26 November, 6.30pm
Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House

Alexander Garvin, vice president of the Lower Manhatten Development Corporation, will speak for the first time in the UK on Ground Zero and the complex issues that have emerged since rebuilding of the World Trade Centre began, on Tuesday 26 November at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

The procedures for picking a new design for Ground Zero, developed by Garvin, constitute a radical departure for urban planning in America and a reinvigoration of American democracy. One of the key actors in a drama that has attracted unprecedented interest from city citizens, Alexander Garvin will speak on the procedures he helped create for picking a new design for Ground Zero, and look at the issues facing city planners of the redevelopment.

The redevelopment of the World Trade Centre has so far proved controversial, with the first batch of proposals for redesign of the site rejected, and six new teams of the world's most talented architects and planners recently chosen to begin new design studies for the site and surrounding areas. Those asked to develop these into plans, will have to submit their ideas for public comment before a decision is made.

Alexander Garvin is vice president of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, commissioner on the New York City Planning Council and Adjunct Professor of Urban Planning at Yale. His book The American City: what works, what doesn't won the American Institute of Architects award as the best book on urbanism in 1996.

This lecture will be co-chaired by Richard Burdett and Tony Travers of LSE. 

Ground Zero: the rebuilding of an American city is free and open to all. No ticket required. 

Ends

To book a press seat or to request an interview with Alexander Garvin, contact Jessica Winterstein on 020 7955 7060 or email j.winterstein@lse.ac.uk| 

18 November 2002

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