Home > Department of Media and Communications > Study > MSc Programmes > MSc Media and Communications Research track
Contact

 

 

Department of Media and Communications
London School of Economics & Political Science
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE

Opening hours:
Tower 2, 6th Floor, Clements Inn
Monday-Friday: 10am-4pm
n.b. closed for lunch 1pm-2pm

 

Tel: Who's Who

 

Email: Who's Who

 

Admissions queries: media@lse.ac.uk 

 

Join our mailing list

 

Maps and directions

 

Follow us: FollowUs

 

Read or contribute to our blogs

 

   

MSc Media and Communications Research track

MCResearch

Overview

This programme offers an intensive, year-long exploration of a wide range of contemporary issues in media and communications whilst also providing advanced research training, enhancing students' methodological and analytical skills. This degree offers:

  • advanced quantitative and qualitative methodological training as preparation for research-related careers 
  • research training for students wishing to undertake MPhil/PhD degrees 
  • recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (1+3 and +3 schemes) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council 
  • a broad and critical understanding of the development and forms of media and communications in relation to processes of mediation and influence, production, media representations and content, audience response, political economy, regulation and power 
  • a critical up-to-date engagement with diverse theoretical, conceptual and empirical developments in research on media and communications 
  • a mix of core and optional courses, culminating in an independent research project in media and communications, that provides an ideal preparation for research or employment in media and communications and related fields 
  • a degree of flexibility to tailor the programme to pursue particular topics of interest by selecting from a wide range of courses taught by leading experts in the Department of Media and Communications and other departments at LSE 

We attract students from a diverse range of backgrounds, often including professional experience working in media and communications related fields. Indeed, the opportunity for cross-cultural meetings and exchange of ideas among the student body is a valuable feature of studying at LSE.

For more details and entry requirements, please check on the School's graduate prospectus page.

Faculty

EllenHelsper2015

Dr Ellen Helsper is Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor in the Media and Communications Department at the LSE. Her current research interests include new media audiences; digital inclusion; mediated interpersonal communication; and quantitative and qualitative methodological developments in media research.

  • Links between social and digital exclusion
  • Mediated interpersonal and social relationships: social identity, intimacy and psychological wellbeing
  • Cross-cultural comparisons of media in everyday life
  • Quantitative methods in media and communications research

Publications
LSE Experts

 

Set out below, you will find some suggested readings that will prove helpful to you in preparing for your arrival at LSE, and for finding out about courses you may be interested in taking.

It is not essential that you read everything on the list - the intention is simply to give you an idea of the level and range of material covered. 

  • Allen, Stuart (ed). The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism. Routledge 2010
  • Beckett, Ch. (2008) SuperMedia: Saving Journalism So It Can Save The World.   Malden, MA: Blackwell/Wiley.
  • Briggs, A. and Burke, P. (2002) A Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the Internet. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Calabrese, A. and Sparks, C. (eds) (2004) Toward a Political Economy of Culture, Capitalism and Communication in the 21st Century, Lanham MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Castells, Manuel. (2009). Communication Power. Oxford University Press.
  • Couldry, N. (2012). Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Curran, J. and Gurevitch, M. (eds) (2005) Mass Media and Society. 4th ed. London: Arnold.
  • Curran, J. and Seaton, J. (2003) Power Without Responsibility. London: Routledge.
  • Mansell, R. (2012) Imagining the Internet: Communication, Innovation and Governance. Oxford University Press.
  • Mattelart, A. (2003) The Information Society: An introduction. London: Sage.
  • McChesney, R (2000) Rich Media Poor Democracy. New York: New Press.
  • Papacharissi, Z. A. (2010). A Private Sphere: Democracy in a Digital Age. Cambridge: Polity. 
  • Silverstone, R. (2007) Media and Morality. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Silverstone, R. (1999) Why Study the Media? London: Sage.
  • Thompson, J.B. (1995) The Media and Modernity: A Social Theory of the Media.Cambridge: Polity.
  • Wasko, J. (ed.). (2005) A Companion to Television. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
  • Wu, Tim. (2010) The Master Switch. The Rise and Fall of Information Empires. Borzio Books. 

The LSE Alumni Network

The international LSE alumni community comprises more than 130,000 people drawn from almost 200 countries. Wherever you are in the world, you can connect with fellow alumni and with the School. You can get involved with the LSE Alumni Association, network with alumni through regional groups or special interest groups, and attend a wide range of public events and lectures or watch them online.

For more information on LSE and departmental alumni events please visit our departmental webpages

 

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|