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LSE Media Policy Project

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  • The proposed new Audiovisual Media Services Directive: Key Features
    In this longer read, Lorna Woods, Professor of Media Law at the University of Essex, explains the main changes and key features of the European Commission’s proposal for a new Audiovisual Media Service Directive. After a draft was leaked last week, the Commission’s proposal to revise the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) is now out. Once again we see the Commission […]
  • Digital Exclusion and the Robot Revolution
    Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’, Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Acting Director of the LSE Media Policy Project, connects current concerns about automated, predictive technologies with the goals of digital inclusion, arguing that broadband adoption policies and programmes need to better prepare members of marginalised communities for a new era of […]
  • Facebook is a news editor: the real issues to be concerned about
    Natali Helberger and Damian Trilling, both of the University of Amsterdam and the Institute for Information Law (IViR), write that whilst Facebook’s use of human editors may bring comfort to some, there are wider issues to do with editorial responsibility that need to be addressed. It’s out. Facebook is not some magic black box news machine. It’s using human editors. […]
  • How Brexit might affect EU audio-visual media services policy-making
    In this post, Alison Harcourt, Professor at the University of Exeter and Senior Fellow on the ESRC programme UK in a Changing Europe, reviews the current context and future of audio-visual media services legislation in the EU, and examines the impact that Brexit might have on UK stakeholders in this sector. In light of the replies to the public consultation on […]
  • A recipe for a right-wing assault on public service media?
    Bart Cammaerts of LSE’s Department of Media and Communications reflects on the recent announcement by the BBC that its recipe website would be closed. While the announcement of the BBC to mothball the BBC Food site seems at first to be a somewhat trivial decision, it proved to be highly controversial and in the mean time the BBC backtracked in […]
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