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Spring 2013 Newsletter

A Decade Back. A Decade Forward.

Monika Lang (MSc Media & Comm, '13) gives her account of the the history of the department and offers a unique student perspective on how it' has grown over the years

From the moment my classmates and I entered the Department of Media and Communications the word interdisciplinary has been emphasised continually. As we now approach our dissertations, we are lucky in that we face such a challenge with a solid foundation of support from the faculty while also being able to draw from the theoretical frameworks found across a number of disciplines. Naturally, the department's evolution is brought to the forefront of discussion as we celebrate its 10th anniversary—a discussion that would be remiss without highlighting the diverse thought it hosts...continue reading|

 

Deconstructing Leveson's Inquiry 

In the wake of the Leveson inquiry, LSE’s Media Policy Project| (MPP) were quick to analyses the proceedings. Jacopo Genovese (MSc Comm. Governance, '13) spoke with MPP director Dr. Damien Tambini| to get the details.

Responding to Lord Justice Leveson’s call for evidence in the wake of the News International phone-hacking scandal the The Media Policy Project swiftly published two policy briefs in June 2012. The first| took a comparative perspective, addressing how press regulation works elsewhere in Europe, while the second| investigated plurality of media ownership and how might media influence be measured in contemporary society...continue reading took a comparative perspective, addressing how press regulation works elsewhere in Europe, while the investigated plurality of media ownership and how might media influence be measured in contemporary society...continue reading|

 

Meet the Neighbors: The New Faculty of 2013

Matilda Baccatti (MSc Media & Comm,'13) sits down with our newest faculty members to learn a little bit about what they do and what makes then tick. 

As our department grows older it continues to expand by welcoming new faculty with niche expertise who are involved in innovative research. January 2013 saw Drs. Wendy Willems| and Alison Powell| permanent join our staff with foci in critical approaches to development and african studies and digital activism and open source cultures, respectively...continue reading and permanent join our staff with foci in critical approaches to development and african studies and digital activism and open source cultures, respectively...continue reading|

 

Are Communications Scholars Facing a Data Analysis Divide?

Big data. Big Questions. Christian Ledwell (MSc Comm & Development, '13) explores the future of communication researcher in light of more computational approaches to inquiry.

Will big data—data unprecedented in scale and scope—create what US computer science professor Lev Manovich calls, a “data analysis divide” between researchers with computer science knowledge and those without? Drs. Mike Savage| and Roger Burrows| argue in their 2007 article The Coming Crisis of Empirical Sociology| that in light of big data the tried and true in-depth interview and sample survey are invaluable but dated methodologies and that social researchers must actively respond to new practices around the “collection, use, and deployment of social data.” and Roger Burrows argue in their 2007 article that in light of big data the tried and true in-depth interview and sample survey are invaluable but dated methodologies and that social researchers must actively respond to new practices around the “collection, use, and deployment of social data.”...continue reading|

 

Research Spotlight: “Arab Revolutions: Media Revolutions”

Cesar Jiminez (PhD Media & Comm, 1st Year) chats with POLIS fellow Fatima El-Issaw to learn more about her research investigating the implications of the Arab Spring for traditional Arab news media.

Since January 2012 Fatima El-Issawi| has led Arab Revolutions: Media Revolutions|, a multi-country study focused on how the national traditional Arab media is adjusting to the post-revolutionary transitions in the region. The project, which is managed by POLIS and funded by the Open Society Foundation, aims to study the implications of the Arab Spring for the practices and values of Arab media scene in countries such as Egypt, Tunisia and Libya as defined by journalists themselves has led , a multi-country study focused on how the national traditional Arab media is adjusting to the post-revolutionary transitions in the region. The project, which is managed by POLIS and funded by the Open Society Foundation, aims to study the implications of the Arab Spring for the practices and values of Arab media scene in countries such as Egypt, Tunisia and Libya as defined by journalists themselves...c|ontinue reading|

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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