Contact

Dr. Nick Anstead

Room TW3.7.01F

Department of Media and Communications

London School of Economics and Political Science

Houghton  Street

London, WC2A 2AE  UK

Tel: +44 020 7955 7529

Twitter (@MediaLSE): twitter.com/#!/medialse

Email:

n.m.anstead@lse.ac.uk

 

 


 

LSE Experts

 

Profile and further information on research expertise

 

Dr. Nick Anstead

Lecturer, Programme Director: MSc Politics & Communication

I was appointed as a Lecturer in the Department of Media and Communication in September 2010, with a focus on Political Communication. Prior to that, I had worked as a Lecturer in Politics at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, after studying for a PhD at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Overview

In general terms, my research focuses on the relationship between existing political institutions and new media, covering such topics as:

  • The impact of the Internet on politics and government, especially e-campaigning
  • Electoral competition and political campaigns
  • The history and future development of political parties
  • Political mobilisation and encouraging participation in civil society

Political institutions, campaigns and new media

My PhD thesis was titled A Comparative Study of Factors Influencing the Adoption and Impact of E-Campaigning in the United States and the United Kingdom. The central question it aimed to address was the differing impact that the internet seemed to be having on electoral politics in the US and the UK. In the former case, high profile candidates, such as Howard Dean and Barack Obama, seem to have made the internet a central part of their campaigns, while in Britain use of new technology seems to be far more limited. I argued this divergence was the result of American political institutions, notably parties, primary elections and campaign finance law, which were better able to adapt to the new environment. In contrast, British political institutions are highly centralised and more risk averse.

I continue to work in this area, examining the evolution of campaigns and parties in the evolving political environment. Working with Mike Jensen of the Autonomous University of Barcelona, I am currently examining a large scale dataset of diverse media from the 2010 British General Election. In particular, we are interested in the interaction between the national and local level of campaigning, as well as the speed that information travels between the two.

The evolution of broadcast media

Technologies like Twitter give citizens the ability to comment on events as they happen. Working with Ben O'Loughlin, from Royal Holloway College, University of London, we started to think about the impact this might be having. In particular, we became interested in the emergence of what we termed the Viewertariat - viewers who are commenting and analysing in real time.

As a preliminary case study of this development, we gathered more than 40,000 tweets from the broadcast period of the BBC Question Time of October 22nd 2009. This episode was particularly significant, as it featured Nick Griffin, leader of the far right BNP. Our provisional working paper was published in February 2010.

In the future, Ben and I will be using the BBC Question Time sample to engage in a more in-depth content analysis, as well as applying the same techniques (and others) to understand the Prime Ministerial debates in the 2010 General Election.

Theorising democracy in the digital era

Working with Michael Bacon, an expert on Pragmatic philosophy at Royal Holloway College, University of London, I am currently trying to develop new ways of thinking about democracy online. One of the most important strands in new thinking about political participation - in large part driven by the development of the internet - is the emerging idea of deliberative democracy. However, practitioners of this approach tend to rely on highly regulated "laboratory style" environments, which are hard to replicate in the real world. Our response to these problems is to draw heavily on the writing of American pragmatist philosopher John Dewey (1859-1952). While he is widely regarded as a father-figure for modern deliberative democrats, Dewey also strongly believed in the "democracy of the everyday" - specifically, that political life should be grounded in people's experiences and associations. Michael and I argue that modern online democracy practitioners would do well to remember this and should make it a central part of their institutional designs. 

Articles

A different beast? Televised election debates in parliamentary democracies
Anstead, Nick (2016) A different beast? Televised election debates in parliamentary democracies. The International Journal of Press/Politics . ISSN 1940-1612

Social media analysis and public opinion: the 2010 UK General Election
Anstead, Nick and O'Loughlin, Ben (2015) Social media analysis and public opinion: the 2010 UK General Election. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 20 (2). pp. 204-220. ISSN 1083-6101

The myth of youth apathy: young Europeans' critical attitudes toward democratic life
Cammaerts, Bart, Bruter, Michael, Banaji, Shakuntala, Harrison, Sarah and Anstead, Nick (2013) The myth of youth apathy: young Europeans' critical attitudes toward democratic life. American Behavioral Scientist, online . ISSN 0002-7642

Psephological investigations: tweets, votes, and unknown unknowns in the republican nomination process
Jensen, M. J. and Anstead, N. (2013) Psephological investigations: tweets, votes, and unknown unknowns in the republican nomination process. Policy and Internet, 5 (2). pp. 161-182. ISSN 1944-2866

Trust, confidence, credibility: citizen responses on Twitter to opinion polls during the 2010 UK general election
Ampofo, Lawrence, O’Loughlin, Ben and Anstead, Nick (2011) Trust, confidence, credibility: citizen responses on Twitter to opinion polls during the 2010 UK general election. Information, Communication and Society, 14 (6). pp. 850-871. ISSN 1468-4462

The emerging viewertariat and BBC Question Time: television debate and real-time commenting online
Anstead, Nick and O'Loughlin, B. (2011) The emerging viewertariat and BBC Question Time: television debate and real-time commenting online. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 16 (4). pp. 440-462. ISSN 1940-1612

Twenty20 as media event
Anstead, Nick and O'Loughlin, Ben (2011) Twenty20 as media event. Sport in Society, 14 (10). pp. 1340-1357. ISSN 1743-0437

Book review: the Conservative party - from Thatcher to Cameron - by Tim Bale
Anstead, Nick (2010) Book review: the Conservative party - from Thatcher to Cameron - by Tim Bale. British Politics, 5 (4). pp. 550-552. ISSN 1746-918X

Internet and campaign finance in the US and the UK: an institutional comparison
Anstead, Nick (2008) Internet and campaign finance in the US and the UK: an institutional comparison. Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5 (3). pp. 285-302. ISSN 1933-169X

The 2008 digital campaign in the United States: the real lessons for British parties
Anstead, Nick and Chadwick, Andrew (2008) The 2008 digital campaign in the United States: the real lessons for British parties. Renewal: a Journal of Social Democracy, 16 (3/4). pp. 86-98. ISSN 0968-252X

Book section

Monograph

Semantic polling: the ethics of online public opinion
Anstead, Nick and O'Loughlin, Ben (2012) Semantic polling: the ethics of online public opinion. LSE Media Policy Project Series, Broughton Micova, Sally, Tambini, Damian and Sujon, Zoetanya (eds.) Media Policy Brief 5. The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Emerging viewertariat: explaining twitter responses to Nick Griffin’s appearance on BBC Question Time
Anstead, Nick and O’Loughlin, Ben (2010) Emerging viewertariat: explaining twitter responses to Nick Griffin’s appearance on BBC Question Time. PSI working paper series, no. 1. School of Political, Social and International Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.

Yes we can: how the lessons from America should change British politics
Straw, Will and Anstead, Nick (2009) Yes we can: how the lessons from America should change British politics. Freethinking papers, Fabian Society, London, UK.

Parties, election campaigning and the Internet: toward a comparative institutional approach
Anstead, Nick and Chadwick, Andrew (2007) Parties, election campaigning and the Internet: toward a comparative institutional approach. Politics and international relations working paper, no.5. New Political Communication Unit, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, UK.

Book 

Youth participation in Europe: hope and disillusion
Cammaerts, Bart, Bruter, Michael, Banaji, Shakuntala, Harrison, Sarah and Anstead, N. (2016) Youth participation in Europe: hope and disillusion. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke. (In Press)

Youth participation in democratic life: stories of hope and disillusion
Cammaerts, Bart, Bruter, Michael, Banaji, Shakuntala, Harrison, Sarah and Anstead, Nick (2015) Youth participation in democratic life: stories of hope and disillusion. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, Hampshire . ISBN 9781137540201

The Change we need: what Britain can learn from Obama's victory
Anstead, Nick and Straw, Will, eds. (2009) The Change we need: what Britain can learn from Obama's victory. Fabian Society, London, UK. ISBN 9780716341079

Website

Book review: the political web: media participation and alternative democracy
Anstead, Nick (2013) Book review: the political web: media participation and alternative democracy. LSE Review of Books (02 Nov 2013) Blog Entry.

Voter Advice Applications give the increasingly non-partisan electorate the means to choose the right political match
Anstead, Nick (2012) Voter Advice Applications give the increasingly non-partisan electorate the means to choose the right political match. British Politics and Policy at LSE (30 Apr 2012) Blog Entry.

Book Review: media practices and protest politics: how precarious workers mobilise
Anstead, Nick and Mattoni, Alice (2012) Book Review: media practices and protest politics: how precarious workers mobilise. LSE Review of Books (2012) Blog Entry.

We should beware the rhetoric of ‘tough talking’ politicians – they almost certainly have an agenda
Anstead, Nick (2011) We should beware the rhetoric of ‘tough talking’ politicians – they almost certainly have an agenda. British Politics and Policy at LSE (26 Sep 2011) Blog Entry.

In the 2010 election, the online space was seen as a battleground to be fought over. In future elections it could be used as a method for better understanding the public
Anstead, Nick and O’Loughlin, Ben (2011) In the 2010 election, the online space was seen as a battleground to be fought over. In future elections it could be used as a method for better understanding the public. British Politics and Policy at LSE (19 Sep 2011) Blog Entry.

The relationship between politics and the media has changed significantly since our last coalition government: we now need to ask more from politicians and their manifestoes
Anstead, Nick (2011) The relationship between politics and the media has changed significantly since our last coalition government: we now need to ask more from politicians and their manifestoes. British Politics and Policy at LSE (13 Sep 2011) Blog Entry.

Two years on, does Obama’s election win still hold lessons for Ed Miliband’s Labour party, in austerity Britain?
Anstead, Nick and Straw, Will (2010) Two years on, does Obama’s election win still hold lessons for Ed Miliband’s Labour party, in austerity Britain? British Politics and Policy at LSE (03 Dec 2010) Blog Entry.

A full list of my publications can be found at my personal website

In 2009, I co-edited (with Will Straw) the Fabian Society pamphlet The Change We Need  , which aimed to understand the lessons British politics could learn from Barack Obama's presidential election victory in the US. In contrast to other discussions taking place at the time, which advocated a simple emulation of American strategies, our argument was British party institutions had to be fundamentally altered to become compatible with the information age. As well as featuring a Foreword from the then Prime Minster Gordon Brown, this publication received widespread national press attention, including coverage from the The Times, The Guardian, Sky News and the Today programme.

I also blog at www.nickanstead.com/blog 

 

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|

Anstead

I will be on sabbatical during Michaelmas Term 2016.