Contact
Prof. Nick Couldry

Room S119e

Department of Media and Communications

London School of Economics and Political Science

Houghton Street

London WC2A 2AE

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7955 6243

Twitter (@MediaLSE) twitter.com/#!/medialse

Email: n.couldry@lse.ac.uk|


LSE Experts Profile|

Professor Nick Couldry

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Biography

Nick Couldry is Professor of Media, Communications and Social Theory in the Department of Media and communications at LSE. As a sociologist of media and culture, he approaches media and communications from the perspective of the symbolic power that has been historically concentrated in media institutions. He is interested in how media and communications institutions and infrastructures contribute to various types of order (social, political, cultural, economic, ethical). His work has drawn on, and contributed to, social, spatial, democratic and cultural theory, anthropology, and media and communications ethics. His analysis of media as ‘practice’ has been widely influential. He is the author or editor of 11 books and many journal articles and book chapters.

Nick Couldry’s PhD (1995-1998) explored background assumptions about the status of media institutions through a study of non-media professionals’ encounters with sites of media power: The Place of Media Power: Pilgrims and Witnesses of the Media Age (2000)|. He developed this into a theory of media rituals which has provided insights into various media forms, from talk shows to reality TV, and from media events to celebrity culture: Media Rituals: A Critical Approach (2003)|. In more recent work, he has explored how media forms reinforce neoliberal norms, as part of a wider theory of voice in neoliberal democracies - Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics After Neoliberalism (2010)| - and how the digital revolution has made the social centrality of media institutions more contested: Media Society World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice|(2012)|

Nick has led the following funded projects: ‘Storycircle’ within the FIRM consortium for the UK Digital Economy programme funded by the EPSRC and AHRC (2010-2013): http://storycircle.co.uk/| and http://www.firm-innovation.net/portfolio-of-projects/storycircle/|; ‘Media Consumption and the Future of Public Connection’ with Sonia Livingstone and Tim Markham funded by the ESRC (2003-2006): http://publicconnection.org.uk/| and http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=400013|; and 'The Dispersed Citizen’ with Ana Langer funded by STICERD (2001-2002). Future new work will explore the uses of ‘analytics’ in everyday social and civic practice, and the processes involved in the mediatization of government (for which seed research funding has been awarded by LSE to Nick, working with Damian Tambini).

Nick taught previously in the LSE Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications (2001-2006), and before rejoining LSE in September 2013 was joint Head of the Department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has been chair of the Philosophy Theory and Critique division of the ICA|  and vice-chair of the Mediatization Temporary Working Group of ECREA|. He has held visiting positions at universities in University of Pennsylvania, University of Stockholm, RMIT Melbourne, Roskilde University, Södertorn University, Stockholm, University of Technology Sydney, and University of Toulouse. In June 2014 Nick was appointed Adjunct Professor in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT, Melbourne, Australia. In 2014 Nick has given invited lectures and seminars in Brazil, Chile, Holland (Utrecht, Gronigen), Portugal, Sweden, and the USA (Boulder, Yale).

His book Media Society World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice has been selected by Choice magazine as one of its Outstanding Academic Titles of 2013.

For selected publications, click here|

Media

For a podcast of a recent conversation about Nick’s latest book Media Society World, click here|

For a video of a recent talk, click here| 

For a podcast of Nick in conversation about cultural studies and social theory, click here|

For a podcast of Nick's inaugural lecture at LSE, click here|

Books

NC_WhyVoiceMatters

Couldry, N. (2010) Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics After Neoliberalism. London: Sage.

NC_MediaEventsGlobalAge

Couldry, N., Hepp, A. and Krotz, F. (eds.) (2009) Media Events in a Global Age. London: Routledge.

 
NC_MediaConsumption

Couldry, N., Livingstone, S. and Markham, T. (2007) Media Consumption and Public Engagement: Beyond the Presumption of Attention.  

NC_listeningbeyondechoes

Couldry, N. (2006) Listening Beyond the Echoes: Media, Ethics and Agency in an Uncertain World, Boulder, CO: Paradigm Press

 
MediaSpace

Couldry, N. and McCarthy, A. (eds) (2004)MediaSpace: Place Scale and Culture in a Media Age. London: Routledge.

NC_ContestingMediaPower

Couldry, N. and Curran, J. (eds) (2003) Contesting Media Power: Alternative Media in a Networked World. Boulder, CO: Rowman & Littlefield

 
 NC_MediaRituals(2)

Couldry, N.  (2003) Media Rituals: A Critical Approach. London: Routledge

NC_Inside-Culture

Couldry, N. (2000) Inside Culture: Reimagining the Method of Cultural Studies, London: Sage.

 
NC_Place-of-MediaPower

Couldry, N.  (2000) The Place of Media Power: Pilgrims and Witnesses of the Media Age, London Routledge,

 

 

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Nick_Couldry

 NC_Ethics-of-Media      

Couldry, N., Madianou, M. and Pinchevski, A. (eds.) (2013) Ethics of Media. Basingstoke: Palgrave/MacMillan.

To buy from Amazon| and Macmillan|

 NC_MediaSocietyWorld   

Couldry, N. (2012) Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice.       

To buy from Amazon |or Polity|