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Department of Media and Communications

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Department of Media and Communications
London School of Economics & Political Science
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE

Opening hours:
Tower 2, 6th Floor, Clements Inn
Monday-Friday: 10am-4pm
n.b. closed for lunch 1pm-2pm

 

Tel: Who's Who

 

Email: Who's Who

 

Admissions queries: media@lse.ac.uk 

 

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Welcome to the Department of Media and Communications. Rated #1 in the UK and #3 globally in the 2017 QS World University Rankings.

SoniaLivingstone2015

The global push for a new international framework governing the rights of children online has gained new momentum, after a multinational study commissioned by Children’s Commissioner, Anne Longfield, found governments and NGOs are calling for formal assistance to recognise and address children’s digital rights. Professor Sonia Livingstone was a key author of this report.

Click here for more information and a link to download the report.

Click here for a LSE Media Policy Project blog post by the authors.

Click here for a radio interview with Sonia Livingstone about the project.

 
LSE IQ

Is social media good for society? In this episode of LSE's new monthly podcast LSE IQ, Jo Bale investigates social media amid growing concerns that tech companies are putting profit before the well-being of individual users and democratic societies.

She talks to the Department's scholars Nick Couldry, Ellen Helsper, Sonia Livingstone and Svenja Ottovordemgentschenfelde.

Listen here.
 
Shani-photo

OUT NOW | Caring in Crisis? Humanitarianism, the Public and NGOs by Irene Bruna Seu and Shani Orgad (2017)

Drawing on an original UK-wide study of public responses to humanitarian issues and how NGOs communicate them, this timely book provides the first evidence-based psychosocial account of how and why people respond or not to messages about distant suffering.

A review from Paul Vanags, Head of Public Fundraising, Oxfam GB, UK here.

 

 

SoniaLivingstone2015

The Culture Secretary has commissioned Professor Sonia Livingstone, Professor Joanne Davidson and Dr Jo Bryce to provide up to date evidence of how young people use the internet, the dangers they face, and the gaps that exist in keeping them safe.

The report will contribute to the Internet Safety Strategy aimed at making Britain the safest country in the world for children and young people to be online. The new cross-Government drive is being led by Culture Secretary Karen Bradley MP on behalf of the Prime Minister with a green paper expected in summer 2017. Read more here.
 
Ellen Helsper

New LSE research commissioned by The Prince’s Trust, in conjunction with Samsung, reveals the disadvantages young people face offline are preventing them from making the most of the online world.  

Slipping through the Net, produced by Dr Ellen Helsper, Associate Professor, reveals a clear distrust by Britain’s most disadvantaged young people of online interactions, which is a major obstacle to using the digital world to improve their situation. Read more here.
 
global_kids_online-large

The Global Kids Online project, launched on 2 November 2016 at the Children’s Lives in the Digital Age seminar held at UNICEF Headquarters in New York, aims to build a global network of researchers investigating the risks and opportunities of child internet use. The Global Kids Online website makes high quality, flexible research tools freely available worldwide.

For more information, visit www.globalkidsonline.net.

Professor Livingstone writes about the project in The Conversation.

 
NickCouldry2015

 

Professor Nick Couldry (@CouldryNick), Head of the  Department of Media and Communications, was featured in The Conversation  on 23 September in an article focusing on ‘The price of connection: ‘surveillance capitalism’.

Professor Couldry’s article explores the risks to freedom, autonomy and democracy posed by living in a society which increasingly relies on connecting individuals through internet platforms. The article is part of a wider project on The Price of Connection that Professor Couldry is undertaking for The Enhancing Life Project, funded by the University of Chicago.

       

 
UCT_Upper Campus_Main

NEW - MSc Global Media & Communicatons (with University of Cape Town)

In our ever more globalised world, gaining international experience is invaluable and gives students a great knowledge and experience base to work from. This unique two year programme enables students to study for one year at LSE in London, the UK’s media capital, and one year at the University of Cape Town – the highest-ranked university on the African continent with close links to Cape Town’s media and film industry and NGO sector.

 

LSE Master’s Awards (LMA’s) for MSc double degree in Global Media and Communications (LSE and UCT) applicants

Two LSE Master’s Awards (LMA’s) are earmarked for African offer holders on the MSc double degree in Global Media and Communications (LSE and UCT). Offer holders should be African residents and preference is given to students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The awards cover the first year of study at LSE, are means tested and up to the value of full fees and living costs at £1,200 per month. Students must have completed the LSE Graduate Financial Support Application form AND received an offer of admission (conditional or unconditional) by 5pm GMT on 26 April 2017. Applicants are therefore advised to apply as early as possible.

In addition, a number of other internal and external funding opportunities for African students are listed here and here. Please note that further announcements on financial support may be made, including regarding students’ second year in Cape Town.

Study at LSE  

PhD Programmes

Interested in our doctoral programmes in Media and Communications or Data, Networks and Society? Submit your details here, including any prospective research proposals that you wish to gain feedback on from academic staff.

 

Is the future of democracy on the web?

Professor Conor Gearty, Director, Institute of Public Affairs and Dr Nick Anstead, Assistant Professor, Media and Communications department discuss the relationship between the internet, the Government and politics. They discuss examples of institutions using the internet in the UK and Germany, the benefits and failures of these initiatives and how we can use the internet for meaningful political engagement.

What does it mean to be a citizen?

Dr Shakuntala Banaji discusses different types of citizenship, and what it means to be a citizen.Why are young people so disengaged and how can we entice them to become active citizens? Who defines what it means to be a good citizen?

Media Industries and Production in China - LSE Research in Mandarin

Dr Bingchun Meng talks to Dr Catherine Xiang about her research in communication governance and media production in the context of globalization and technological shifts.They also discuss the empowering potential of digital networks in new communicative practices, and the obstacles to this empowerment.

Children's Rights in the Digital Age - Sonia Livingstone Public Lecture

Recorded on 11 February 2015, Sonia Livingstone explored whether children’s rights are enhanced or undermined by access to the internet. A blog post by Professor Livingstone also entitled Children’s Rights in the Digital Age can be viewed at the LSE Media Policy Project blog.

Gearty Grilling: Sonia Livingstone - are our children safe online?

Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Media and Communications, discusses the challenges of keeping children safe online.

Gearty Grilling: Lilie Chouliaraki on Media Ethics & Humanitarianism

Professor Lilie Chouliaraki discusses the moral implications of the use of celebrities by humanitarian organisations.

Polis

Indigenous Sámi media adds value to Nordic societies
This chapter has been published in June 2017 in the book “The Difficult Freedom of Speech – Nordic Voices” by the Nordic Council of Ministers For a small indigenous people like the Sámi in Finland, totalling 10,000 people, their own media plays an important role. Sámi media plays an important role also in the Nordic democracy. Providing Sámi people with […]

Nine media trends changing our complex and unstable public sphere
As political journalists are only too aware, we are in an age where the act of prediction is struggling to cope with a complex, unstable, diverse world. This is especially true of news media and information structures because they are going through profound and rapid change. We can look to the past for some models of media disruption. Timothy Wu’s MasterSwitch or […]

 

Parenting for a Digital Future

The Internet of Toys: Implications of increased connectivity and convergence of physical and digital play in young children
How are children’s play objects shaped by technological inventions? As toys become increasingly connected online, Bieke Zaman, Donell Holloway and Leila Green research the ‘Internet of Toys’. The the data they report in this post show that parents generally welcome these changes because they offer new ways of playing, learning, and the possibility of extreme personalization. Bieke Zaman is associated with mintlab and researches how we […]

Learning or loafing – watching summer TV
Now that children are out of school for the summer, parents and carers will inevitably turn to a screen (of some sort) to keep children occupied. How can this be a productive, learning and enriching time for children even when in front of a screen? Alicia Blum-Ross encourages parents and carers to let children experiment, play, and relax this summer, offering […]

 

Media Policy Project 

If children don’t know an ad from information, how can they grasp how companies use their personal data?
All EU member states have until May 2018 to incorporate the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) into British law. Article 8 states that, unless member states decide otherwise, children under the age of 16 years old will require parental permission to use “information society services”, which refers to most online resources. Most provisions of the GDPR are to improve personal […]

Why the end of net neutrality is not the end of the open internet
The public consultation period on the US Federal Communications Commission’s proposal to repeal net neutrality, the principle that all traffic on the Internet should be treated the same, ends today, July 17. With 8.5 million comments, this has been by far the most widely debated policy issue in FCC’s history. The rules under consideration for repeal were adopted only two […]