Events

Future Past: the impact of LGBT history today

Hosted by the LSE Library

LSE Library LIFE Workspace 2, United Kingdom

Speakers

Meg-John Barker

Sue Sanders

Steve Slack

A panel discussion looking at the impact of past figures and campaigns and the lessons to be learnt today; with Steve Slack on ‘Edward Carpenter – His LGBT+ legacy’, Sue Sanders, ‘What did Section 28 do for us?’ and Meg-John Barker, ‘Non-Binary Gender Across Time and Space’.

Edward Carpenter – His LGBT+ legacy

Edward Carpenter is not as widely known about as he should be. His writings on LGBT+ issues, the life he lead as a lover of other men and his influence on modern day LGBT+ rights need to be recognised and celebrated. Here in Sheffield we are raising funds to have a public piece of art produced in his name. This is his story and the story of our journey to get him more widely recognised.

What did Section 28 do for us?

Section 28 had a profound effect on our community and our allies, many don’t understand how it came about or how we fought it. In these days of Trump DUP and May, we need to know how to be vigilant and have ideas on how to resist

Non-Binary Gender Across Time and Space

This presentation provides the brief - often hidden - history of the UK non-binary movement, based on the chapter on non-binary gender from Christine Burns's recent edited collection 'Trans Britain'. It traces the deep history of non-binary thinking about gender, as well as charting how gender is understood in different ways geographically - around the world. It then focuses in on the untold story of the years leading up to the current UK non-binary movement, and the very recent history of that movement which is currently moving very fast.

Meg-John Barker is an author, academic, activist and psychotherapist. A Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the Open University in the United Kingdom.

Sue Sanders is Professor Emeritus at Harvey Milk Institute and is Chair of Schools OUT UK, an organisation for educators that helps them include LGBT people in the classroom.

Steve Slack is Chief Executive of SAYiT, which works with young LGBT+ people and on the Friends of Edward Carpenter Committee.

The British Library of Political and Economic Science was founded in 1896, a year after the London School of Economics and Political Science. It has been based in the Lionel Robbins Building since 1978 and houses many world class collections, including The Women's Library.

Follow the debate on Twitter: #LSELGBT

See other events for LGBT+ History Month.

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