Common problems

We've written some advice that deal with some of the most common difficulties that students experience:

There are many different reasons why a student may want help from the counselling service. You don't need to fully understand what is causing the difficulty in order to make an appointment, and the nature of the problem might become more clear during the initial assessment/ first meeting.

Counselling can offer you a space to talk and think about problems and difficulties, and many people find it helpful to be able to do this with someone who is not a friend or family member. Counsellors are not the same as doctors and psychiatrists, and cannot prescribe medication. Counselling is not about giving advice, but can help you understand difficulties. Your counsellor can work with you to help you make decisions and changes that may work better for you.

Some of the difficulties that students often raise include:

  • problems with anxiety and stress; social anxiety;
  • depression; loneliness;
  • adjusting to a new culture; homesickness;
  • problems with family, friends or intimate relationships;
  • sexuality;
  • sexual problems;
  • bereavement and loss;
  • study problems, including difficulties with writing, speaking and putting things off (procrastination) and perfectionism;
  • racism and harassment;
  • sexual abuse; coping with trauma; sexual harassment;
  • sexual assault
  • disability;
  • feeling suicidal;
  • eating disorders;
  • addictions, including alcohol, drugs and gambling.

There may be other problems that you wish to discuss that are not included in this short list.

 


 

Further information

 


 

 

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