15 Feb 2012

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Kurt Barling at World Stage talk    Kurt Barling at World Stage Event    Kurt Barling at World Stage Event

To listen to a podcast of this event, click on the link below:

podcast 15 Feb 2012|

LSE Alumnus

Kurt BarlingKurt Barling graduated with a PhD in International Relations and MSc in Government from LSE, lectured in the International Relations Department at the School and in 1989 moved to the BBC where he has worked on the most prestigious news and current affairs programmes including Newsnight, BBC News, Today and The Money Programme.  Kurt has also worked on Radio 4's Inside Money and Money Box.

He has made dozens of documentaries on a range of subjects including the fall of the Berlin Wall, how the United Nations could ensure children's rights, about President Mitterrand, General Noriega and on the crisis in Yugoslavia and the award-winning Who Killed PC Blakelock?

When Kurt became a presenter for Black Britain he investigated Pentonville prison to look at the growth of Islam amongst black prisoners. He reported from Atlanta on the black and white prejudice against mixed race children, and also investigated the increasing numbers of firearms related murders in the West Midlands.

In 1996 he won his first reporter of the year award and subsequently more Commission for Race Equality media awards for his reporting and documentaries in 1997, 2003, 2005, 2006. than any other British journalist. In 2010 he was awarded a Justice Link award by the UK Attorney General. He has won and been shortlisted for many more awards.

From 1997-2000, he was BBC News Correspondent and since 2001 he has been the Special Correspondent for BBC London News. Since 2005 he has written a weekly column for BBC London Online which became his blog, Barlings London for which in 2011 he won a Best Writer, Online Media Award.

Kurt also established his own production company in 2000 making films and tackling controversial subjects including Abu Hamza and the Finsbury Park Mosque, questioning whether black athletes have a genetic advantage and about Bernie Grant, UK's first Afro-Caribbean MP.

Kurt last spoke to an LSE audience in Los Angeles in 2011. He talked about London's experience of terrorism to the alumni group. In this talk he reflected on his time at LSE and considered how this influenced his career at the BBC within the theme of the evening's topic:  'Does Culture Matter?'

Mark Hoffman and Kurt Barling at World Stage reception

Chair

Mark Hoffman lectures in the Department of International Relations and is Dean for General Course students at LSE.

Student Speakers

Rajiv GopieRajiv Gopie explains:
I'm from Trinidad and Tobago, Presidents medal and scholarship winner 2006. I did my undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto with concentrations in management, international studies and socio cultural anthropology. Currently at the LSE doing a MSc. International Relations.
I'm fundamentally interested in international economic diplomacy and the experiences of small developing states in the international system. I am currently a writer in the largest newspaper in Trinidad and Tobago where I advocate for youth issues and social justice. I am heavily involved in human rights and minority rights causes. I spend most of my time interacting and learning from different people as my pedagogy of learning is based on experiences and interaction over traditional learning methods.
In the future I hope to return to my country and aid in its development by serving the state as a diplomatic officer or trade negotiator.


Sehrish Ejaz-KhanSehrish Ejaz-Khan is a Pakistani undergraduate Scholar and is currently in her third year studying BSc Economic History with Economics at the LSE. She has previously interned in the ILO, UNDP and Morgan Stanley and is a two-time Secretariat member of LIMUN – Europe's largest Model United Nations Conference. Her academic interests lie in studying labour markets of developing countries, the economics of imperialism and financial history. Beyond that, she is an avid parliamentary debater and a poet who writes extensively on the human experience of political and economic meltdown. She says 'mylong-term plans involve a career in corporate finance, an industrial township and saving the world, which is another way of saying they're complicated!'

 Rajiv Gopie     Sehrish Ejaz-Khan

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