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'The day lasts more than a hundred years' - LSE hosts a photographic portrayal of people's lives in Kyrgyzstan

'The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years' - И дольше века длится день - A Photographic Portrayal of People's Lives in Kyrgyzstan by Babken V Babajanian will be on display at in the Student Services Centre at LSE from Monday 3 December 2007 to Friday 11 January 2008.

No time to rest|

A reception will be held on Wednesday 12 December from 7-9pm. Professor Janet Hartley will open the exhibition in the company of Babken V. Babajanian, Research Associate in the Department of Social Policy and Jude Howell Director of NGPA.


The set of compelling photographs gives insight into the lives of ordinary men, women and children living in rural Kyrgyzstan today. The break-up of the Soviet Union has brought an end to the authoritarian Communist regime in Kyrgyzstan. At the same time, the collapse of the socialist economy resulted in the decline in income and living standards of the population. All of a sudden, thousands of people lost not only their jobs, income and savings, but also social status and their place in social networks. People's everyday lives and their futures have become uncertain and insecure. The exhibition portrays images of people who struggle with poverty and yet manage to maintain their dignity, human warmth and sense of familial and communal belonging.

The sweetest melons in the world|

The exhibition seeks to promote greater awareness of Kyrgyzstan in the United Kingdom. There is little familiarity with Central Asia in the West. The image of Borat has dominated mass culture in the recent years and many people struggle to differentiate between the Central Asian countries, often referring to them as 'stans'. The photographs are a product of the research that Babken conducted in Kyrgyzstan in 2007. The research project examines patterns of local governance and welfare provision in rural communities in Kyrgyzstan

Babken V Babajanian| is a research associate at the Department of Social Policy at LSE.

Three generations|

The research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council under the ESRC Non-Governmental Public Action Programme (NGPA). The NGPA Programme aims to better understand the impact of public action by non-governmental actors.

For more information please contact: Richard Hylton, arts co-ordinator at LSE, 020 7852 3793.

Notes:

The exhibition title has been taken from a novel by Kyrgyz writer Chingiz Aitmatov, originally published in Russian in 1980 .

The research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council under the ESRC Non-Governmental Public Action Programme (NGPA). The NGPA Programme aims to better understand the impact of public action by non-governmental actors. The focus of the programme is not just on non-governmental organisations (NGOs), but on a broader range of formal and informal non-governmental actors concerned with poverty reduction and social transformation. It has funded a wide range of researchers working in the UK and internationally. The researchers are based in universities, think-tanks, civil society organisations, projects and networks around the world. The director of the NGPA programme is Professor Jude Howell, based at the LSE Centre for Civil Society, in the department of Social Policy. To find out more about the NGPA, please visit www.lse.ac.uk/ngpa|.

28 November 2007

 

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