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Atrium Gallery - Submitting a proposal

Guidelines

Thank you for showing interest in the Atrium Gallery. If you are interested in exhibiting at LSE, whether internal to LSE or an external organisation you must complete a  proposal form below.

When completing the form please be aware that the majority of exhibitions presented in the Atrium Gallery (Old Building) are programmed on average between 6 to 12 months in advance.  This is to allow sufficient time for planning, fundraising (if appropriate) and organising any complimentary programme of events. 

Proposals will usually receive an initial expression of interest within six to eight weeks of submission.  LSE Arts has no dedicated source of funding, therefore we will ordinarily expect proposals to come with a minimum level of funding, to cover core exhibition costs. Proposals will also be assessed against certain key institutional objectives, the intrinsic merit of the work and other criteria linking to the academic values and activity here at the School.  Proposals should also show logistical and financial practicability.

Gallery vacancy:

The Atrium gallery has no exhibitions scheduled for the following dates:

10 August 2015 onward

Submitting a proposal:

If you are interested in submitting a proposal Please download and complete this form| (Word)

Please also see the Internal Guidelines (pdf)| or External Guidelines (pdf)| for more information on organising exhibitions with LSE Arts. 

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Images from Viewing Restricted: [Re]presenting Poverty|, 27 April - 14 June 2009.  Organised by the LSE Centre for the Study of Global Governance in collaboration with LSE Arts.  Viewing Restricted| featured works from Jessica Dimmock (New York), Mishka Henner (London), Sharron Lovell (Shanghai), Subhash Sharma (Mumbai) and Ali Taptik (Istanbul).  Images in the display case are early photographs of East End tenements from the LSE Archive.

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