Academic Development Programme

LSE’s Academic Development Programme is a year round series of events designed for academic and research staff who are keen to pursue professional development and enhance the impact of their teaching and research. 

This page also contains summaries and event booking links for the 2016/17 programme. To book a place on these sessions, click the title link of the session. If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know. 

Download a copy of our flyer/wallchart by clicking the cover image to the right. For materials related to these sessions, contact the tutor named below as the session convener.

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If you require any information, or wish to discuss any aspect of the Programme (or provide feedback on a past event) please email the Teaching and Learning Centre at tlc.academicdevelopment@lse.ac.uk. Similarly, if you have booked a place on one of our sessions, and have relevant disability/access issues of which to inform us, please contact us at the same email address.

For events hosted in collaboration with LSE Research Division, please click the link provided. 

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Summer Term events

 

Engaging students through gamification

Tuesday 2 May 2017

   13:00

14:30

 Mark Baltovic

Gamification refers to applying ideas and practices from game design to other activities. In this workshop we shall discuss the gamification of learning and what insights it offers into course design and delivery.

 

 

Research methods: teaching practice and exchange

Tuesday 16 May 2017

   12:30

14:00

 Mark Baltovic and Lee-Ann Sequeira

Anyone who has taught or experienced a research methods course recognises the particular challenges posed by teaching research methods. This is a forum for the sharing of knowledge and exchange of practice among colleagues across the School who teach research methods courses.

For an overview of a recent forum , please see this blog post.

 

 

PhD Supervision: Challenging supervision dilemmas

Thursday 18 May 2017

   12:00

14:00

 Dr Jenni Carr

Research on PhD supervision has shown that there are many ‘normal’ challenges a supervisor may face, from developing a critical voice (given the inherent power relationship in PhD supervision), a loss of confidence or lack of progress on the part of the student to the difficulty of inheriting a student or managing a tricky shared supervision arrangement. These, as well as challenges that may be specific to LSE or to your discipline, will be addressed by a panel of experienced supervisors and professional service staff, and there will be opportunities for questions, discussion and networking with colleagues.

Free lunch and a tour of the new PhD Academy space are included!

 

 

Blended learning on intensive programmes and courses

Thursday 25 May

   12:30

14:00

 Dr Claire Gordon

LSE runs an increasing number of intensive courses though its Summer School programme, an ever growing number of Executive MSc programmes and a range of pre-sessional courses. When planning such courses and programmes it is easy to underestimate the critical importance of effectively designing and integrating the learning and teaching which takes places away from the School with the face-to-face interactions.

As part of the workshop participants will explore different approaches to blended learning. They will consider the relationship between online and face-to-face teaching and learning on their programmes as well as the possibilities offered by digital technologies for active and creative learning and collaboration.

 

 

LSE Teaching Café  (Summer Term)

Thursday 1 June 2017

   09:45

 11:00

 Dr Claire Gordon and Jane Hindle

Speakers to be announced! For information on previous cafés, see our Teaching Cafés page.

Breakfast buffet and refreshments provided.

 

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Past events

Lent Term 2016/17

Effective teaching skills for GTAs

Wednesday 18 January 2017

 13:00

 14:30

 Dr Erik Blair 

Once you have a framework for your teaching, the planning, preparation and in-class activity become more straightforward. This workshop is for GTAs from across the School. It will be particularly useful to those new to teaching but more experienced GTAs should also feel free to attend for the chance to hear about some stimulating approaches to teaching.

The workshop is designed around three simple frameworks that can be applied to the teaching of any subject. The workshop will look at the three part teaching structure; the types and functions of questions, and how we can get the right balance between supporting and challenging students. Through applying these frameworks your teaching will become more structured, more focussed and more effective.

 

Teaching controversial subjects

Monday 30 January 2017        13:00    14:30           Dr Esther Saxey 

Do your students have strong reactions to your courses? Challenging subject matter can engage students, but sometimes causes distress, anger or alienation. This workshop draws on the practice of LSE academics teaching in controversial areas, on pedagogic research, and on counselling practice to develop strategies for maximising learning. Staff from the Teaching and Learning Centre and Student Counselling Service will deliver the session together, discussing both advance planning and in-the-moment responses.

Who should attend?

All academics are welcome to attend, but the session is of particular use to anyone teaching in areas which generate strong emotions.

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop, attendees will be able to:

  • Compare their own practice to the diverse approaches of LSE staff who teach controversial material
  • Share their tools for planning and establishing a productive teaching environment, and evaluate new examples from peers and literature
  • Develop their handling of strong student responses, or challenging behaviour

 

 

Developing your teaching skills through film

Wednesday 1 February 2017

 14:00

 17:00

 Mark Baltovic 

This session provides participants with the opportunity to have a small segment of a seminar or lecture filmed and then to discuss it with peers. Feedback will focus on presentations skills as well as content delivery. Participants will leave the session with new ideas for developing their teaching practice as well as a short film of their class for further study.

 

 

What TQARO does not tell you  (rescheduled from 20 January)

Thursday 2 February 2017

  13:00 

 14:30 

 Dr Neil Mclean and Lee-Ann Sequeira

Are you making the most of your TQARO evaluations? Do they help you understand which parts of your course are working well and where you can improve? Do the open-ended comments tell a different story from your scores? Learn about how TQARO and other forms of evaluation can inform and improve your teaching.

Who should attend?

Anyone with responsibility for course and programme teaching and management, including lecturers, class teachers, course managers and course convenors/leaders who have direct responsibility for teaching and course provision.

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of this workshop, we will have considered:

  • How to interpret TQARO data – scores, open-ended comments, comparative scores, etc.
  • How TQARO data can inform our teaching and improve the course experience for students
  • Which evaluation tools can be used to complement the data collected by TQARO

“One of the things I’ve learnt over the course of my teaching is not to make changes till I’ve heard it from a lot of students. The problem arises when I get conflicting feedback.”      - Connson Locke, Senior Lecturer in Practice

To learn about how Connson solved this issue and other examples of interpreting feedback, please sign up for the workshop.

 

 

Effective course design

Friday 17 February 2017

 10:00

 16:00

 Dr Claire Gordon  and Dr Colleen McKenna

This  workshop explores the principles and practices of course design in higher education. Participants should come to the workshops with plans for a new course they are intending to design. The sessions will give participants the opportunity to explore the building blocks of course design (aims and learning outcomes, assessment and teaching and learning activities, course evaluation) through the pedagogy of constructive alignment (Biggs, 1996 and 2002).  By the end of the session participants will have a preliminary outline of their new course and the tools to develop it further as well as an appreciation of how to support student learning through effectively aligning the different components of the curriculum at the course and programme level.

 

 

Designing and delivering learning on intensive courses

Tuesday 21 February 2017

 12:30

 14:00

 Dr Claire Gordon 

The LSE is offering an ever increasing range of intensive courses through its Executive Master’s and Summer School programmes. This workshop explores good practice in course design and delivery on such compressed programmes. By the end of the session participants will have be able to identify a range of approaches for responding to course design delivery challenges and opportunities on intensive educational programmes.

 

Using oral assessment in quantitative subjects

Wednesday 22 February 2017

 12:30

 13:30

 Dr Paola Iannone and Mark Baltovic

Dr. Paola Iannone (Mathematics Education Centre - Loughborough University) will talk about her research into the summative assessment of mathematics and, in particular, about her experiences in implementing oral assessments in a first-year undergraduate mathematics module. The session would be of interest to anyone interested in exploring alternative methods of assessment on their own courses and programmes. 

 

Practice exchange forum: teaching large quantitative classes

Thursday 23 February 2017

 15:00 

 16:30 

 Mark Baltovic and Lee-Ann Sequeira

This is a new forum created by the Teaching and Learning Centre specifically for lecturers responsible for, or involved in, the delivery of large quantitative courses. It is intended to provide a space for academics to share practice and explore the different and innovative approaches that are being used in such courses across the School.

During each session speakers from across the School will talk about their practice as a starting point for a wider discussion about the common challenges faced by departments in teaching quantitative subjects.

Speakers for this session will be Professor Steve Pischke (Economics) and Prof Daniel Ferreira (Finance), on the incorporation of real-life examples and case studies in their large courses. This would be relevant to anyone who is teaching large undergraduate classes (qualitative or quantitative) and is interested in making their teaching more relevant and applicable to the world around us. Both professors also teach postgraduate courses, so they will be able to discuss and provide insight into how these methods translate to those areas as well. 

 

Designing and assessing group work

Tuesday 28 February 2017                            

   12:30            

14:00              

Dr Colleen McKenna                       

Learning to work in a group is an invaluable skill for students in terms of both their disciplinary studies and future employment. During this session academics from across the School will present their experience of group projects on undergraduate and postgraduate courses in both formative and summative assessment. They will be joined by members of LSE’s academic development team who will present a range of approaches to the design and delivery of groupwork and effective assessment.

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Michaelmas Term 2016/17

Introduction to LSE: International perspective

Wednesday 28 September                   

   16:00            

17:30              

Dr Claire Gordon and Dr Esther Saxey                       

This informal session aims to support any academics whose previous higher education experience has been outside the UK. Existing LSE staff who have experienced this transition will share their expertise, and answer your questions on UK Higher Education - from practical and administrative issues, to cultures and traditions.

 

Writing in the classroom: ways of promoting active learning through short written tasks

Wednesday 5 October      

  12:30      

   14:00       

   Dr Colleen McKenna                                                   

Academic writing is often viewed as a product, particularly in relation to assessment. For example, essays, reports and exams are generally thought of as fixed texts that represent a culmination of learning. This workshop will consider ways in which writing can be viewed as part of the learning process. In particular, we will look at a range of short writing tasks and techniques that can be used in classroom teaching, and we will consider how formative writing can contribute to learning in the disciplines.

 

The review and promotion process: teaching and research

presented by LSE Academic and Professional Development Division and LSE Human Resources

Wednesday 5 October  

13:00 

    14:00  

Prof Eric Neumayer and Dr Neil Mclean

As part of the New Academic Career, candidates for promotion at Major Review and promotion to professor are required to demonstrate to Promotions Committee their contribution across three areas: research, education and citizenship. This session outlines how this process is conducted and how to make a strong case for your contribution to the taught provision, research profile and life of your department. The session is for those who are preparing their applications this coming year, for those who wish to build towards making strong applications over the coming two or three years, and for those who will mentor or advise their colleagues as they go through the promotion process. 

 

Supervising MSc dissertations

Wednesday 12 October

12:30

 14:00

 Dr Claire Gordon and Dr Jenni Carr

This workshop is designed for academics across the School who are involved in MSc supervision. The session opens with a brief discussion of the current UK Masters and considers how the level/standard differs from both the undergraduate and the doctoral level qualifications. By the end of the sessions participants will be able to distinguish the roles and responsibilities of a Masters supervisor at different stages of work on the dissertation as well as identify key milestones in a successful project.

 

Lecturing at the LSE: ideas and approaches

Thursday 13 October

12:30

14:00

 Dr Neil Mclean

Lecturing can inspire, intrigue and celebrate disciplinary knowledge. Yet while some lecturers thrive on the buzz it can give, for many it can instil anxiety. This workshop applies the theory of communicative pragmatics to show how lecturers can work successfully with an audience, generate listening and rapport, and build credibility and community with students.

  

Supervising PhD students: the LSE context

Wednesday 19 October

 12:00

 14:00 

Prof Linda Mulcahy, Dr Claire Gordon and Dr Jenni Carr

For those new, or relatively new, to LSE or to the role of PhD supervisor, this session will cover the key ‘need to know’ information. A panel of three current PhD supervisors, as well as staff in LSE’s Teaching and Learning Centre and PhD Academy, will address institutional culture, practices and policies and there will be plenty of time for questions, discussion and networking. Free lunch and a tour of the PhD Academy space are included!

 

Research methods: teaching practice and exchange

Thursday 20 October

   12:30

14:00

 Dr Jenni Carr

Anyone who has taught or experienced a research methods course recognises the particular challenges posed by teaching research methods. This is a forum for the sharing of knowledge and exchange of practice among colleagues across the School who teach research methods courses.

For an overview of a recent forum meeting, please see this blog post.

 

Building student learning through effective feedback

Monday 24 October

12:30

14:00

 Dr Jenni Carr

Providing students with effective feedback is one of the key ways academics can contribute to their learning. This session will discuss best practice in this area, including the role learning technologies can play; include opportunities for attendees to share their own practice; and allow participants to reflect on their feedback skills through a practical exercise.

 

Promoting active learning in quantitative disciplines

Wednesday 2 November                13:00           14:30            Mark Baltovic

This workshop will present innovative approaches to teaching in quantitative disciplines that can help to develop and sustain active learning in students both inside and outside the lecture. It is primarily intended for lecturers and course convenors, and would also be of interest to members of staff thinking of designing new courses.

 

The core elements of good course design

Friday 4 November

12:00

14:00

Dr Claire Gordon 

Participants should come to the session with plans for a new course they are intending to design. This practical session will give participants the opportunity to explore the building blocks of course design (learning outcomes, assessment and teaching and learning activities) in the context of the pedagogy of constructive alignment (Biggs, 1996 and 2002).

By the end of the session participants will have an outline of their new course and the tools to develop it further as well as an appreciation of how to support student learning through effectively aligning the different components of the curriculum at the course and programme level.

 

Encouraging student contributions in small group teaching

Tuesday 8 November

13:00

14:30

Dr Esther Saxey

When students speak in seminars and classes, academics can assess their progress, and students develop their understanding and their retention of concepts. But this invaluable activity is one of the hardest to control or predict. Can particular teaching practices promote useful student contributions? What expectations and understandings do students have? Participants will be able to evaluate some practical approaches, includes scholarly research in the area, and is an opportunity for participants to share their own practice. Any academics involved in small group teaching are welcome to attend.

 

The inclusive curriculum in practice: learning from the LSE100 laboratory

Thursday 10 November

   13:00  

14:00 

Dr Claire Gordon and Dr Jessica Templeton

Higher education institutions across the UK have been reviewing their approaches to inclusivity and diversity in curriculum design and delivery. The LSE’s Education Strategy commits itself to integrating inclusivity and diversity initiatives into the design and delivery of LSE taught provision by 2020. During this 60 minute workshop the LSE100 team will discuss how they have interrogated and integrated different approaches, notions and practices of inclusivity and diversity into the LSE100 course. The session would be of interest to all academic teachers across the School as well as other colleagues involved in diversity and inclusivity initiatives.

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Download a copy of our Academic Development Programme 2016/17 flyer/wallchart here
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