Word 2010 - Anchoring Charts, Graphics and Other Objects

Introduction

Word contains features which facilitate insertion of graphics, charts, tables, photographs and other types of objects within a document.  However, if you later add additional text or objects above existing ones, the previously inserted objects often move to inappropriate areas of the page or sometimes even to different pages from the text they illustrate.

To correct this problem, use the instructions below to anchor objects to the text you want them to appear near.

Anchoring objects in a word document

To anchor graphics, tables & charts in your document:

1. Select the item to be anchored

2. Click the Format  Tab in the Drawing Tools

Note: The Drawing Tools option will only be visible if an image is selected.

Format Picture

3. Click on the Wrap Text button in the Arrange group and select More Layout Options

Format picture 2

4. In the Text Wrapping tab, choose any layout other than In Line with Text

5. Click the Position tab

format picture 3

6. In the Options section at the bottom of the dialogue box, tick both the Move object with text and Lock anchor boxes

8. Use the options in the Horizontal and Vertical sections of the same dialogue box to fix the position of the object as required

9. If you want text to flow around the object, move to the Text Wrapping tab and select the option you need

10. Click OK to close the Advanced Layout dialog box

11. Click OK to activate the settings you've chosen  

Viewing Anchors

If you are having problems managing the location of an object in a document, check to see whether it has been anchored in some way.  If it has, you can adjust the settings discussed in the section above.  If not, anchor it as required.

To check whether an object has been anchored:
1. Click on the Home Tab and turn on the Show/Hide icon located in the Paragraph section. This will show many of the non-printing commands in your document

Show/Hide icon

2. Select the object. If it has been anchored, an anchor symbol will appear on or near the object, as illustrated below.

Example anchoring

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