Career research

The section on understanding yourself helps you define your criteria for selecting jobs. Careers research is about finding out what industry sectors and jobs might match those criteria.

When exploring opportunities, it is important to keep an open mind at first. You can decide whether your ideas are realistic opportunities at a later stage in the career planning process. Keeping an open mind may uncover a job you've never considered or even heard of before.

Desk research

  • Employment sectors - begin investigating industries and job roles in sectors where LSE students often start their careers.
  • Graduate Destinations - see what LSE graduates go on to do after graduation.  
  • Prospects - browse the extensive, 'Types of Jobs' section.
  • Options with your subject - find out about the career paths of recent UK graduates in your degree subject.
  • Target Jobs - lots of information in 'A-Z of careers'.
  • Browse career sections and careers case studies on the websites of professional bodies representing sectors that interest you. You can find some professional bodies bookmarked in our Delicious account which you can filter by sector or try Totalprofessions.com 
  • Read job advertisements on vacancy boards and in newspapers and journals. Which attract you? Look at senior jobs, not just the entry level posts. If you find a job you aspire to do, look at the experience it requires and research how you might gain it.
  • You can carry out a similar exercise on LinkedIn. Look at the previous positions people have worked in to get to their current role.
  • 10 Minutes With -  watch video interviews with top senior executives - try also icould and Careerplayer
  • Look at employer websites which often have trainee videos
  • Read job profiles on thecareerproject.org
  • Research the UK job market for different careers by region using the National Careers Service website.

Active research

  • Ask friends and family questions about their work. These might include:  'What do you do in your work most of the time?,'  'What do you most enjoy about your job?',  'What parts of your work are the most challenging?'
  • Ask for "information interviews" with people doing jobs that interest you. A personal introduction isn't essential - in the UK this kind of initiative is the norm in some sectors such as media and charities. Download information interviews (pdf) for a list of suggested questions.
  • Attend LSE careers events where you can learn about careers in particular sectors, including events run or attended by employers.
  • Visit the LSE Careers resource centre to find reference and take away material on all occupational areas - 5th Floor, Saw Swee Hock Student Centre
  • Try and arrange some work experience or volunteering - see Work experience and internships.
  • Book a careers discussion with one of our careers consultants. They can discuss your ideas with you, give you advice/support and help you structure your career research.
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