Home > Department of International Relations > IR research > Staff Publications: new books

Staff Publications: new books

Below are some recent books from members of the Department.
There is also a list of recent articles and chapters|

Credit Ratings and Sovereign Debt: The Political Economy of Creditworthiness through Risk and Uncertainty
|(Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
Bartholomew Paudyn

At the heart of the struggle to constitute the 'politics of limits' – the parameters defining the budgetary realities facing governments – is the growing antagonistic relationship between the imperatives of private (financial) markets and public democracies. Through a new analytical instrumentality, this interdisciplinary account problematizes credit ratings and the problem of sovereign debt to show how the authoritative knowledge underpinning the political economy of creditworthiness is constructed through the deployment of the discursive practices of risk and uncertainty. Unpacking the 'black-box' of sovereign ratings, as a socio-technical device of control and governmentality, we better understand how their authoritative capacity/utility are constituted through their performative effects, which create the conditions and subjectivities that serve to validate and regenerate a disinflationary fiscal normality/rectitude. Political judgment is censured through depoliticizing risk techniques; as a (fallacious) analytics of ratings helps elevate quantitative expertise and relegates competing, qualitative approaches in the design of a neoliberal politics of limits. This exacerbates the asymmetry between epistocracy and democracy, which prompts attempts to reclaim lost fiscal sovereignty.

BPcreditratings
 

European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World, 3rd Edition
|(Polity, 2014)
Karen E Smith

The European Union finds itself at a critical juncture; not only has the deepening crisis in the eurozone weakened the EU’s internal structure, it has impacted significantly on its international image and external relations. The third edition of European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World offers a clear and detailed analysis of the complexities and challenges of contemporary European foreign policy-making.

This accessible and thoroughly researched book will be a valuable resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students of European politics, foreign policy analysis, international relations and related disciplines.

KES_EUforeignpolicy
 

China and Mozambique: From Comrades to Capitalists
|(Jacana, 2014)
Edited by Chris Alden and Sergio Chichava

The wide range of reactions to greater Chinese involvement across Africa has varied from enthusiastic embrace by elites to caution from businesses, trade unions and civil society, and even hostility from some local communities. As a once-modest presence in Africa, China has rapidly grown to become one of Africa's top trading partners. Two-way trade surged from just over US$10 billion in 2000 to nearly US$200 billion in 2012.

China and Mozambique moves beyond the conventions of general surveys on China-Africa relations to explore real content and experiences of China's relationship with Mozambique. This book unpacks the complex and sometimes contradictory policies of this relationship, looking at Chinese investment in the Mozambican banking sector and at elite business alliances in agriculture and infrastructure.

A fuller sense of bilateral relations is offered through the focus on this emblematic case; it drills down into the heart of a relationship

For all orders, email orders@onthedot.co.za|  

CAchinaandmozambique
 

Men at War: What Fiction Tells Us About Conflict, From the Iliad to Catch-22
|(Hurst, 2014)
Christopher Coker

Since Achilles first stormed into our imagination, literature has introduced its readers to truly unforgettable martial characters. In Men at War Christopher Coker discusses some of the most famous of these fictional creations and their impact on our understanding of war and masculinity. Grouped into five archetypes—warriors, heroes, villains, survivors and victims—these characters range across 3000 years of history, through epic poems, the modern novel and one of the twentieth century’s most famous film scripts.

Great authors like Homer and Tolstoy reveal to us aspects of reality invisible except through a literary lens, while fictional characters such as Achilles, Falstaff, Robert Jordan and Jack Aubrey are not just larger than life, they are life’s largeness; and this is why we seek them out. Although the Greeks knew that the lovers, wives and mothers of soldiers are the chief victims of battle, for combatants war is a masculine pursuit. Each of Coker’s chapters explores what fiction tells us about war’s hold on the imagination of young men and the way it makes—and breaks—them. War’s existential appeal is also perhaps best conveyed in fictional accounts, and this too is scrutinised. 

Five Star review by Antony Beevor in Sunday Telegraph 9 March 2014|

CCmenatwar
 

Can War be Eliminated?
|(Polity, 2014)
Christopher Coker

Throughout history, war seems to have had an iron grip on humanity. In this short book, internationally renowned philosopher of war, Christopher Coker, challenges the view that war is an idea that we can cash in for an even better one - peace. War, he argues, is central to the human condition; it is part of the evolutionary inheritance which has allowed us to survive and thrive. New technologies and new geopolitical battles may transform the face and purpose of war in the 21st century, but our capacity for war remains undiminished. The inconvenient truth is that we will not see the end of war until it exhausts its own evolutionary possibilities.

CCcanwarbeeliminated
 

The New Middle East: Protest and Revolution in the Arab World|
(Cambridge University Press, 2014)
Edited by Fawaz A Gerges

This book is the first comprehensive and interdisciplinary study to examine the causes, drivers, and effects of the events of the Arab Spring on the internal, regional, and international politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Gerges and his team of leading scholars investigate specific conditions, but also highlight broader connections between individual case studies and systemic conditions throughout the Arab world, which include the crisis of political authority, the failure of economic development, and new genres of mobilisation and activism, especially communication technology and youth movements. Last but not least, they also reflect on the prospects for democratic change in individual states and in the region as a whole.

FGnewmiddleeast

 

Classics of International Relations: Essays in Criticism and Appreciation
|(Routledge, 2013)
Edited by Henrik Bliddal, Casper Sylvest and Peter Wilson

This book introduces, contextualises and assesses 24 of the most important works on international relations of the last 100 years. Providing an indispensable guide for all students of IR theory, it asks why are these works considered classics? Is their status deserved? Will it endure? It takes as its starting point Norman Angell’s best-selling The Great Illusion (1909) and concludes with Daniel Deudney’s award winning Bounding Power (2006). The volume does not ignore established classics such as Morgenthau’s Politics Among Nations and Waltz’s Theory of International Politics, but seeks to expand the ‘IR canon’ beyond its core realist and liberal texts. It thus considers emerging classics such as Linklater’s critical sociology of moral boundaries, Men and Citizens in the Theory of International Relations, and Enloe’s pioneering gender analysis, Bananas, Beaches and Bases. It also innovatively considers certain ‘alternative format’ classics such as Kubrick’s satire on the nuclear arms race, Dr Strangelove, and Errol Morris’s powerful documentary on war and US foreign policy, The Fog of War.

With an international cast of contributors, many of them leading authorities on their subject, Classics of International Relations will become a standard reference for all those wishing to make sense of a rapidly developing and diversifying field.

PCWclassicsofir
 

The Handbook of Global Climate and Environment Policy|
(Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)
Edited by Robert Falkner

This book presents an authoritative and comprehensive overview of international policy on climate and the environment. It brings together a global team of experts from the fields of environmental politics, international relations, economics, and law, who explore current debates and the latest thinking in the search for global environmental solutions. The volume reviews the key environmental challenges, concepts, and approaches; examines the role of global actors, institutions, and processes; and considers the links between the global economy and global environmental politics.

RFglobalclimatehandbook
 

Diplomatic Sites: A Critical Enquiry
|(Hurst Publishers, 2013)
Iver B Neumann

Although diplomacy increasingly takes place in non-traditional settings that are increasingly non-Western, our debates about diplomacy still focus on traditional points of contact such as the conference table, the ministerial office and the press conference. This book is framed as a discussion on whether increasing globalisation and the rise of powers such as China, India and Brazil will precipitate a crisis in diplomacy; it also tackles the problem of diplomatic Eurocentrism head on.

The author, who has broad working experience of diplomacy, reflects on sites that range from the dining table — a quotidian and elementary meeting place where all kinds of business is settled amid a variety of culturally specific but little-known practices — via the civil-war interstices where diplomats from third parties try to facilitate and mediate conflict, to grand diplomatic extravaganzas, the object of which is to overwhelm the other party.

In a media age, popular understanding of diplomacy is a force to be reckoned with, hence the book discusses how diplomacy is represented in an almost wholly overlooked space, namely that of popular culture. The author concludes that, far from being in crisis, diplomatic activity is increasingly in evidence in a variety of sites. Rather than being a dying art, in today's globalised world it positively thrives.

IN-diplomaticsites
 

Warrior Geeks: How 21st Century Technology is Changing the Way we Fight and Think About War
|(Hurst Publishers, 2013)
Christopher Coker

Warrior Geeks examines how technology is transforming the way we think about and fight war, taking three major changes that are driving this process: cybernetic technologies that are folding soldiers into a cybernetic system that will allow the military to read their thoughts and emotions and mould them accordingly; the coexistence of men and robots in the battle-spaces of tomorrow; and the extent to which we may be able to re-engineer warriors through pharmacological manipulation.

By referring back to the Greeks who defined the contours of war for us, Coker shows how we are in danger of losing touch with our humanity – the name we give not only to a species but the virtues we deem it to embody. The journey from Greeks to Geeks may be a painful one. War can only be rendered more humane if we stay in touch with the ancestors, yet unfortunately we are planning to subcontract our ethical choices to machines. In revaluing technology, are we devaluing our humanity, or the post-human condition, changing our subjectivity and thus the existential dimension of war by changing our relationship with technology both functionally and performatively?

CCWarriorGeeks
 

Orientalism and War|
Edited by Tarak Barkawi and Keith Stanski
 (London: Hurst and New York: Columbia University Press, 2012)

The papers in this volume, which include chapters by Bruce Cumings, Susan Jeffords, and John Mowitt among others, explore three dimensions of the relations between Orientalism and war. The first concerns the representations of ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ that mark the participation of Orientalism in war and which, for example, suffuse media coverage of the War on Terror. Second are the ways in which war is productive of Orientalisms. It is in and through violent conflict that various Western and Eastern identities are defined and come to be taken for granted. The third is about the inverse relation: how Orientalisms amount to acts of war. By redefining politics and identities in such a way as to require a West that brings order to an unstable, violent East, Orientalism is productive of war. Patrick Porter closes the volume in an afterword about the themes explored in these papers and questions for further reflection.

TBorientalismandwar

 

IRAQ - From War to a New Authoritarianism|
(IISS Adelphi Paper 2012)
Toby Dodge

The 2003 invasion of Iraq was undertaken to dismantle a regime that had long threatened its own population and regional peace, as well as to establish a stable, democratic state in the heart of the Middle East. In his latest book, Toby Dodge looks at the legacy of that intervention. He analyses the evolution of the insurgency, the descent into civil war and the ‘surge’ as a counter-insurgency strategy and examines US and Iraqi efforts to reconstruct the state’s military and civilian capacity. He concludes by arguing that Iraq is heading back into authoritarianism under Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki.

Review in The Economist 16 March 2013|.

TDIraq
 

The Diffusion of Power in Global Governance
|(Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
Edited by Stefano Guzzini and Iver B Neumann

The study of global governance has often led separate lives within the respective camps of International Political Economy and Foucauldian Studies. Despite vast differences in these approaches, Guzzini and Neumann's study recognises that ongoing changes in global governance go far beyond a proliferation of steering techniques and has a systems-changing potential. As politics becomes increasingly global in character and the number of agents attempting to govern grows, this in-depth range of case studies suggests the emergence of a global polity.

INdiffusionpower
 

At Home with the Diplomats. Inside A European Foreign Ministry
|(Cornell University Press, 2012)
Iver B Neumann

The 2010 WikiLeaks release of 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables has made it eminently clear that there is a vast gulf between the public face of diplomacy and the opinions and actions that take place behind embassy doors. In At Home with the Diplomats, Iver B. Neumann offers unprecedented access to the inner workings of a foreign ministry. Neumann worked for several years at the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where he had an up-close view of how diplomats conduct their business and how they perceive their own practices. In this book he shows us how diplomacy is conducted on a day-to-day basis.

INhomediplomats
 

US Foreign Policy
|(second edition, OUP, 2012)
Edited by Michael Cox and Doug Stokes 

This book provides the most comprehensive overview of America's role in international politics. Expert contributors focus in turn on the historical background, institutions, regional relations, and contemporary issues that are key to its foreign policy-making.

The second edition includes two new chapters on Obama's use of smart power and a debate on the nature of U.S. hegemony. All chapters have been updated with important developments including the effects of the global financial crisis, the on-going conflict in Afghanistan, and political uprisings in the Middle East.

Incorporating helpful learning features and an extensive accompanying website, this is the ideal textbook for students of U.S. foreign policy.

MCusforeignpolicy
 

The Ashgate Research Companion to International Trade Policy
|(Ashgate, 2012)
Edited by Kenneth Heydon and Stephen Woolcock

This volume provides a state of the art review of current thinking on the full range of trade policy issues, addressing the economic and political dimensions of international trade policy.  It includes a systematic examination of specific trade policy instruments, sectoral concerns, trade linkages and systemic considerations.

The organising theme of the volume is that open markets for trade and investment yield large potential gains in human welfare as long as trade policy is conducted as an integral part of broader domestic economic management and regulatory reform, and as long as the particular challenges facing developing countries are effectively addressed. This 'case' is presented on the basis of rigorous analysis of first principles and of empirical experience among key trading nations.

SWInternationalTradePolicy
 

Obama and the Middle East: The End of America's Moment?
|(Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
Fawaz A Gerges

During his presidential campaign, Obama promised to distance the United States from the neoconservative foreign policy legacy of his predecessor, George W. Bush, and usher in a new era of a global, interconnected world. Taking stock of Obama's first two and a half years in the White House, this book places his engagement in the Middle East within the broader context of U.S. foreign policy since 9/11 and examines key areas that have posed a challenge to his administration: negotiation with Israel and Palestine, troop levels in Iraq and Afghanistan, engagement with the Arab Spring, intervention in Libya, and the death of Osama bin Laden.

Read a review in The Economist|.
Read a review in the Times Higher Education|.

FG-ObamaandMiddleEast
 

European Union Economic Diplomacy|
(Ashgate, 2012)
Stephen Woolcock

This book provides the first comprehensive analysis of the factors that determine the role of the EU in economic diplomacy. In an up-to-date treatment that includes consideration of the impact of the Treaty of Lisbon, it contains a comprehensive explanation of decision making and negotiating processes in the core areas of trade, financial market regulation, environmental diplomacy and development co-operation. The book is intended for those interested in EU policy making, but also those who simply need to understand how the EU functions in the field of economic diplomacy. 

2014: Now also available in a Chinese edition from Shanghai People's Publishing House, 193 Fujian Zhong Rd, 200001, Shanghai, P.R. of China,

EU Economic Diplomacy 
 
Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|
topsofbooksmosaic