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International Relations Department
London School of Economics &
Political Science
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

 

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NB: the Department is physically located in Clement House, 97-99 The Aldwych, London WC2.

 

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Current Events

LSE Arts Public Exhibition:

Thinking Visually, Feeling Visually: Student Films from the International Relations Department

Date: Monday 30 January - Friday 24 February 2017
Time: Monday - Friday, 10.00am - 8.00pm
Venue: Atrium Gallery, Old Building

Student Films from the International Relations Department

In ‘Visual International Politics’ (IR318), International Relations students don’t just watch movies – they make their own films. This exhibit screens six short documentary films that address topics ranging from the global politics of beards (‘Beard Goggles’), to a behind the scenes look at London’s Russian elite (‘Bliny vs. Scones’), to a political ethnography of passengers on ‘The Night Bus’. Download the event banner for further information.

The course is taught by Professor William A. Callahan (IR Department) and Darren Moon (LTI). This exhibition is co-organised by LSE’s International Relations Department and Learning Technology and Innovation unit, and is in association with LSE Arts.

This exhibition is open to all, no ticket required. Visitors are welcome during weekdays (Monday - Friday) between 10am and 8pm (excluding bank holidays, when the school is closed, at Christmas and Easter, or unless otherwise stated on the web listing). Please note the exhibition will close at 3pm on Friday 24 February.

For further information email arts@lse.ac.uk or phone 020 7955 6043. 

Suggested hashtag for this exhibition: #LSEArts

LSE-Arts
 

International Relations Public Lecture:

The Future of Global Governance and the Fall of International Organisations

Date: Wednesday 15 March 2017, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Venue: Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor Jon C. W. Pevehouse
Chair: Dr Ulrich Sedelmeier

Formal international organisations in the world are in decline. Does this mean trouble for global governance or will new institutional forms succeed where IOs failed?

Jon C. W. Pevehouse is Professor of International Relations and Political Methodology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Ulrich Sedelmeier is Associate Professor in the International Relations of Europe in the Department of International Relations at LSE.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre registration required.

Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email s.wise3@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 6821.

Suggested hashtag for this lecture: #LSEPevehouse

Pevehouse-Jon
 

International Relations Public Lecture:

The Distribution of Identity in World Politics and Hegemonic Transition

Date: Monday 20 March 2017, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Venue: Clement House, Room 5.02
Speaker: Professor Ted Hopf
Chair: Professor Toby Dodge

This lecture is part of the Foreign Policy Analysis lecture series on Competing theoretical trends within Foreign Policy Analysis and the future development of the discipline.

Ted Hopf is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore.

Toby Dodge is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Middle East Centre at LSE.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre registration required.

Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email s.wise3@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 6821.

Suggested hashtag for this lecture: #LSEFPA

Hopf-Ted
 

International Relations Book Launch:

Public Opinion, Legitimacy and Tony Blair’s War in Iraq

Date: Thursday 27 April 2017, 6.30 - 8.00pm
Venue: Clement House, Room 6.02
Speakers: Dr James Strong, Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, and Professor Juliet Kaarbo
Chair: Professor Toby Dodge

How was it possible for Britain to wind up fighting a war in Iraq that so many British people considered illegitimate? An illuminating new book by LSE Fellow Dr James Strong attempts to offer some answers.

This event marks the book’s publication with a roundtable discussion of its contents, featuring a presentation from Dr Strong and analysis from leading experts on Foreign Policy Analysis, Britain’s role in the Iraq War and Iraqi politics.

James Strong (@dr_james_strong) is Fellow in Foreign Policy Analysis at LSE, where he received his PhD in 2012. His research interests encompass constructivist and neoclassical realist approaches to understanding foreign policy, and UK and US foreign policy in the ‘war on terror’ era.

Lawrence Freedman (@LawDavF) is Professor of War Studies at King’s College, London. His research ranges across contemporary strategic, defence and foreign policy issues, and his notable publications include the Official History of the Falklands Campaign (Routledge, 2005) and Strategy: A History (Oxford University Press, 2013). Between 2009 and 2016 he served as a member of the UK’s official Iraq Inquiry (the “Chilcot” Inquiry). He appears here as a scholar rather than as a representative of the Inquiry.

Juliet Kaarbo is Professor of Foreign Policy at the University of
Edinburgh. Her research ranges across Foreign Policy Analysis, including constructivist and cognitive theoretical approaches, and work looking at Dutch, German, Israeli, Japanese, Turkish, UK and US foreign policy. Her notable publications include Coalition Politics and Cabinet Decision Making (University of Michigan Press, 2012) and (edited with Cristian Cantir) Domestic Role Contestation, Foreign Policy and International Relations (Routledge, 2016).

Toby Dodge (@ProfTobyDodge) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Middle East Centre at LSE. His research focuses on the role of the postcolonial state in the international system, specifically in the Middle East in general and Iraq in particular. Notable publications include Iraq: From War to a New Authoritarianism (Routledge, 2013) and Inventing Iraq: The Failure of Nation-Building and a History Denied (University of Columbia Press, 2005).

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre registration required.

Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries email s.wise3@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 6821.

Suggested hashtag for this lecture: #LSEStrong

Public Opinion, Legitimacy and Tony Blair’s War in Iraq is published by Routledge. Hard copies and e-book versions are available from the publisher’s website. Flyers featuring a discount code will be distributed at the event.

Strong-James
 

International Relations and European Foreign Policy Unit Symposium:

Symposium in Honour of Professor Christopher Hill

Date: Friday 12 May 2017, 2.00 - 6.00pm
Venue TBC to registered attendees

Professor Christopher Hill FBA was the Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at the LSE from 1991 to 2004; from 2004 to 2016, he was the Sir Patrick Sheehy Professor of International Relations at Cambridge University, and is now Professor Emeritus at Cambridge.

He has written extensively on European foreign policy, and has had a significant impact on the community of scholars working on foreign policy, European foreign policy, and international relations. His most recent books include: Foreign Policy in the Twenty-First Century, 2nd edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015); The National Interest in Question: Foreign Policy in Multicultural Societies (Oxford University Press, 2013); and National and European Foreign Policies: Towards Europeanization, edited with Reuben Wong (Routledge, 2011). At the LSE he founded the European Foreign Policy Unit.

This symposium explores the contribution his work has made to the study of European foreign policy and foreign policy more generally.

For further information, download the provisional programme.

For any queries or to register a place at the symposium, please e-mail s.wise3@lse.ac.uk. Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis.

Hill-Christopher
 
            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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