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News Archive - 2011

History @ LSE - 92% student satisfaction in National Student Survey 2011

LSE History graduates have rated their degrees among the best in the country in the National Student Survey, the results of which were published on 17 August 2011. The overall satisfaction rating for History of 92% was also the joint highest recorded by LSE as an institution. The full results of the NSS for 2011 can be found through Unistats|.

Alvandi thesis - "Best Dissertation of the Year on a Topic of Iranian Studies"

Dr Roham Alvandi's thesis "Nixon, Kissinger and the Shah: US-Iran Relations and the Cold War, 1969-1976" has been awarded the "Best Dissertation of the Year on a Topic of Iranian Studies" by the Foundation for Iranian Studies| for the academic year 2010-11. The Committee praised the dissertation for "shedding new light on the political and geostrategic context that provided the framework for close cooperation between the Shah and President Nixon, including the Shah's agency in the initiation and evolution of the Nixon Doctrine" and "identifying openings to further refinement of the study of Cold War politics".

International History Roundtable Series 2011-12

Following on from last year’s success, the Department is continuing its series of roundtables focusing on key issues which are linked to your courses but not a simple repeat of regular classes. The discussions will consist of ten minute talks given by the academic staff followed by a Q&A session.

This year’s first roundtable took place on 23 November at 18:30  in the New Theatre (EAS.E171, East Building).

The proposition to be debated is "Is America's role as the world's leading power now coming to an end?"  Speaking for the motion will be Dr Steven Casey|; speaking against will be Professor Alan Sked|. The chair will be taken by Professor Nigel Ashton|.

The debate is open to all and there will be a question and answer session before closing statements. You are then welcome to continue the discussion with participants informally at the pub.  

IDEAS co-Director Arne Westad elected Fellow of the British Academy

Professor Arne Westad| was one of only 38 academics to be elected to the British Academy at its Annual General Meeting on 21 July|.

The British Academy is the UK's national academy for the promotion of the humanities and social sciences. It is an independent, self-governing body of more than 900 Fellows, including Marina Warner, Seamus Heaney, Eric Hobsbawm and Lord Bragg.

Professor Westad was recognised for his field-leading work in the history of the Cold War, and for his expertise in contemporary international affairs. As well as co-directing IDEAS, Professor Westad is an editor of the journal Cold War History, and general editor of the recently published three-volume Cambridge History of the Cold War. Professor Westad has published fourteen books on a wide variety of topics in international history. His new book China and the World: A Global History of Chinese Power 1750-2050 will be published in the autumn.

The Academy's President, Sir Adam Roberts, said, 'I congratulate all the distinguished Fellows who have been elected to the Academy this year, on achieving this peer group recognition of the outstanding contribution they've made to scholarship and research in the humanities or social sciences. Election is not only an honour, but also a beginning. I look forward to their active participation in the life and work of the Academy.'

Nominations for the 2011 AHA Election

Arne Westad|, professor of international history and co-director of LSE IDEAS|, has been nominated as one of two candidates for president of the American Historical Association|. With more than 18,000 individual members, the AHA is the world's largest organization of historians, and plays an important public role as a leader and public advocate for the field. Within the profession, the Association defines ethical and professional standards, and offers advice on good practices in the field. Externally, the Association works broadly on behalf of historical studies, the collection and preservation of historical documents and artefacts, and the dissemination of historical research. The election will be in the autumn.

Dr Angela Romano joins the Department as a Marie Curie Research Fellow

Dr Angela Romano has been awarded a two year European grant to carry out a project entitled 'EC Ostpolitik' which will explore the European Community's (EC) relations with the Soviet bloc across two periods: the flourishing of détente in the first half of the 1970s, and the decade of increasing East-West tensions in the period 1975-1985. We're delighted to welcome her on board.

Professor Ute Daniel appointed Gerda Henkel Visiting Professor for 2011-12

The German Historical Institute London (GHIL), the International History Department of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and the Gerda Henkel Foundation in Düsseldorf are pleased to announce that they have made their third appointment to the position of Gerda Henkel Visiting Professor in the field of Germany in Europe. For the first time, the timeframe for the research promoted in this position has been extended to cover the period from 1890 to 2000.

From 1 October 2011, Professor Daniel, professor of modern history at the Technical University in Brunswick, will spend a year researching at the GHIL and teaching at LSE. Professor Daniel's research will be on relations between the mass media and politics in the twentieth century, a topic which she will investigate comparatively in Germany, Britain, and the USA.

IH PhD Student awarded Partnership Mobility Bursary

Zhong Zhong Chen, a first-year PhD candidate in the department supervised by Dr Kristina Spohr-Readman|, has been awarded one of the two Partnership PhD Mobility Bursaries available for 2011-12. The bursary will enable him to visit PKU for 2-3 months in order to work with academics on his thesis project.

Full details about the Partnership Mobility Bursaries, including application procedures, can be found in this .pdf| briefing document. Any further enquiries should be directed to academic_partnerships@lse.ac.uk|.

Class Teaching Prize awarded to Chris Parkes

Chris Parkes| has been awarded a recent departmental class teaching prize by the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC). Each year, TLC invites all departments to recognise the special contribution made to teaching by Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) and guest teachers.

The awards are based on the result of student feedback surveys, feedback from the lecturers responsible for the courses in departments that employ GTAs and guest teachers and other informal feedback available locally. Congratulations to Chris.

International History public lecture "With Our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918"

Date: Thursday 9 June 2011
Time: 6.30-8:00pm
Venue: Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building
Speaker: Professor David Stevenson

David Stevenson retells the story of the final year of the First World War. In a remarkable piece of original research he goes to the roots of this dramatic reversal of fortune, analysing the reasons for Allied success and the collapse of Germany and its partners. Everything from food supply to finance, strategy to technology, logistics and morale is explored in an assessment that lays bare the nerve-racking decisions and sheer uncertainty faced on both sides.

David Stevenson is a Professor of International History at LSE, and author of the highly praised 1914-1918: The History of the First World War. This event marks the publication of his new book With Our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries please e-mail Milada Fomina at M.Fomina@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 7331.

Book Launch Event: "Corruption and Anti-Corruption in India, from the 1930s to the Present Day"

Date: Friday 3 June 2011
Time: 6.30pm (speakers begin at 7pm) 
Venue: Graham Walace Room
Speakers: Dr Sarah Ansari (RHUL), Dr Taylor C. Sherman (LSE), and Dr William Gould (Leeds).

You are warmly invited to attend this event, which marks the launch of "Bureaucracy, Community and Influence in India: Society and the State, 1930s-1960s" (Routledge Studies in South Asian History), by William Gould.

About the book:

Offering a fresh approach to the issue of government and administrative corruption through 'everyday' citizen interactions with the state, this book explores changing discourses and practices of corruption in late colonial and early independent Uttar Pradesh, India. The author moves away from assumptions that the state can primarily be associated with the top levels of government, and looks at citizens' approaches to local level bureaucracies and police. The central argument of the book is that deeply 'institutionalised' corruption in India could only have come about through the exercise of particular long-term customs of interaction between agencies of the state – government servants and police – and their engagement with local politicians. Because social hierarchies that condition such interactions are complicated by individual and family connections to state employment, periods of traumatic state transformation lead to a reconfiguration in the meaning of corruption in the local state. http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415776646/ |

International History Seminar: "The Balfour Declaration as a British Interest: British Imperialism and Zionism"

Date: Thursday 2 June 2011
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: CON.H103, Connaught House
Speaker: Professor Michael Cohen 

The presentation will re-appraise the origins of the Balfour Declaration and the reasons for the British commitment to establishing and maintaining a mandate in Palestine.

Professor Cohen is an Emeritus Professor at Bar Ilan University, Israel.

He is the author of many books on British foreign policy and the history of the Middle East, including Origins and Evolution of the Arab-Zionist Conflict; Palestine: Retreat from the Mandate; Fighting World War III from the Middle East; and Churchill and the Jews.

The seminar is open to all who are interested. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries please e-mail M.Fomina@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 7331.

Human Rights--a post-colonial tradition? A view from Mali

Speaker: Professor Gregory Mann, Columbia University
Chair: Dr Joanna Lewis, LSE
Date: 18 May 2011
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: CON.H703, Connaught House

The Department of International History at LSE, in association with the Department of History at Columbia University in New York, has organised a research seminar: Human Rights--a post-colonial tradition? A view from Mali.

Gregory Mann is an associate professor at Columbia University, specializing in the history of francophone West Africa . He is currently working on two projects: a history of political belonging in the Sahel (1946-1978); and a study of political discourse on colonial history in African post-colonies.

LSE Annual Austrian History Lecture: "Habsburg Lessons for Europe"

Speaker: His Excellency, the Ambassador of the Republic of Austria, Dr. Emil Brix
Date: Thursday 5th May 2011
Time: 6.00pm
Venue: Shaw Library

The LSE Annual Austrian History Lecture  will be given on 5 May this year by His Excellency, the Ambassador of the Republic of Austria, Dr. Emil Brix, who will speak on "Habsburg Lessons for Europe" .

The lecture will take place in the Shaw Library at 6:00pm. For any queries please e-mail Milada Fomina at M.Fomina@lse.ac.uk| or call 020 7955 7331.

Nominations for the 2011 AHA Election

Arne Westad|, professor of international history and co-director of LSE IDEAS|, has been nominated as one of two candidates for president of the American Historical Association|. With more than 18,000 individual members, the AHA is the world’s largest organization of historians, and plays an important public role as a leader and public advocate for the field. Within the profession, the Association defines ethical and professional standards, and offers advice on good practices in the field. Externally, the Association works broadly on behalf of historical studies, the collection and preservation of historical documents and artefacts, and the dissemination of historical research. The election will be in the autumn.

TV Documentary featuring former IH PhD Student Thesis

The thesis of former International History PhD student, Stéphanie Hare, Duty, Death and the Republic: The Career of Maurice Papon from Vichy France to the Algerian War| (completed in 2008, supervised by Dr Robert Boyce) was featured in a documentary shown on French national television (France 2) on April 14. More details on the documentary, Maurice Papon, itinéraire d'un homme d'ordre, can be found at: 
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xi8tdc_maurice-papon-itineraire-d-un-homme-d-ordre-1_webcam|

A review and a short extract from it can be seen at:

http://www.culturclub.com/circus/jdp_alachaine/jdp-chaine-0619_maurice-papon-itineraire-d-un-homme-d-ordre_infrarouge_france-2.html

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2011 National Student Survey for Final Year Undergraduates

The 2011 National Student Survey is intended to canvas the views of final-year undergraduates students about their experiences at university in the United Kingdom. This represents an opportunity to voice your opinion on the standard of teaching, academic feedback and support, university administration and facilities, and your overall impression of your time studying history at LSE.

Alongside the departmental surveys, the NSS is a very important reflection of our relationship with our students, particularly in continuing to develop and improve our approach to our subject area in light of their comments.

As a result, we strongly encourage all of our final-year students to take the time to complete the NSS through its online form at http://www.thestudentsurvey.com/|  It takes very little time (less than five minutes) and the information is kept strictly confidential."

Department of International History Annual Lecture: Germany in the World, 1500-2000: Outlines of a Transnational History

Speaker: Professor David Blackbourn
Chair: Professor Dominic Lieven
Date: Thursday 17th March 2011
Time: 6:30pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre

The nation cannot be its own context. This lecture considers German history in the modern era from a transnational perspective. David Blackbourn looks at the movement of people and commodities, ideas and practices, pointing to the cross-border contacts and exchanges that linked Germany to a wider world and helped to shape its history.

David Blackbourn is Coolidge Professor of History and Director of the Center for European Studies at Harvard. He is the author of many works on modern German history, most recently The Conquest of Nature (2006)

For further information, contact: Milada Fomina, m.fomina@lse.ac.uk|, ext. 7331 

Book Launch and Talk "The Tyranny of Opinion: Honor in the Construction of the Mexican Public Sphere"

Speaker: Professor Pablo Piccato (Columbia University)
Chair: Dr Tanya Harmer
Date:  16 March 2011 
Time: 6:30pm
Venue: NAB.2.04 , New Academic Building 

The Tyranny of Opinion|

In the mid-to-late nineteenth century, as Mexico emerged out of decades of civil war and foreign invasion, a modern notion of honour—of one's reputation and self-worth—became the keystone in the construction of public culture. Mexicans gave great symbolic, social, and material value to honour. Only honourable men could speak in the name of the public. Honour earned these men, and a few women, support and credit, and gave civilian politicians a claim to authority after an era dominated by military heroism.

Tracing how notions of honour changed in nineteenth-century Mexico, Pablo Piccato examines legislation, journalism, parliamentary debates, criminal defamation cases, personal stories, urban protests, and the rise and decline of duelling in the 1890s. He highlights the centrality of notions of honour to debates over the nature of Mexican liberalism, describing how honour helped to define the boundaries between public and private life; balance competing claims of free speech, public opinion, and the protection of individual reputations; and motivate politicians, writers, and other men to enter public life. As Piccato explains, under the authoritarian rule of Porfirio Díaz, the state became more active in the protection of individual reputations. It implemented new restrictions on the press. This did not prevent people from all walks of life from defending their honour and reputations, whether in court or through violence. The Tyranny of Opinion is a major contribution to a new understanding of Mexican political history and the evolution of Mexican civil society.

Pablo Piccato is a Professor in Latin American History and Director of the Institute for Latin American Studies at Columbia University, specializing in Mexican history. He has worked on the political and cultural history of Mexico, and on the history of crime. He is currently working on an overview of crime in Mexico during the twentieth century.

http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=18876|  

2nd History Roundtable: Has Europe ever had a common identity?

Speakers: Dr Heather Jones, Dr Paul Keenan, Dr Joan-Pau Rubiés, Dr Paul Stock
Chair: Dr Piers Ludlow
Date: 2 March 2011
Time: 18.30-20.00
Venue: NAB 1.07

The Department of International History is pleased to announce the second event in its Roundtable Discussion Series. The question for discussion is 'whether Europe has ever had a common identity', with contributions examining the issues from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. The panel will consist of Dr Heather Jones, Dr Paul Keenan, Dr Joan-Pau Rubiés and Dr Paul Stock, with the discussion being chaired by Dr Piers Ludlow. There will be a chance for the audience to question the panellists after their short presentations in a Q&A session in the second half of the roundtable.

This event is free and open to all students. However, given limited seating, you need to book a place. To do so, please e-mail Milada Fomina at M.Fomina@lse.ac.uk| with the subject "2nd History Roundtable" and stating your full name, programme and year of study. You will receive an e-mail confirmation which you will need to print and present at the entrance to the lecture theatre on the day of the event. As places are limited, please book early in order to avoid disappointment.

Nabila Ramdani on Turmoil in the Arab World

Nabila Ramdani, a PhD candidate in International History and a freelance journalist,recently participated in an Intelligence Squared debate at the Royal Geographical Society in London on Tuesday 15 Feb 2011. The debate, entitled "Turmoil in the Arab world: Is the genie of democracy out of the bottle?".

She has also written on recent events in the Middle East in a piece for /Open Democracy/: http://www.opendemocracy.net/tony-curzon-price-nabila-ramdani/did-internet-matter-in-tunisia-and-egypt.

More information on Nabila's work can be found at: http://nabilaramdani.com/|. She was recently voted the inaugural European Muslim Woman of Influence (2010) and is currently completing a thesis on the Egyptian Revolution of 1919.

Talking with Nazis

Speaker: Mr Laurence Rees
Chair: Professor Dominic Lieven
Date: Friday 18th February 2011
Time: 5:00-6:30pm
Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building

Laurence Rees introduces and comments on clips selected from his television documentaries, 'The Nazis: a Warning from History' and 'Auschwitz'. Both series made extensive use of interviews with former Nazis, many of whom perpetrated terrible atrocities. Laurence will also reflect more generally on the ethical and practical issues entailed in using such material as historical evidence. Laurence Rees has won high acclaim for his work as a producer of historical documentaries, and has published widely on the history of the Second World War. He is currently a Senior Visiting Fellow in the International History Department.

IH Student in RowZambezi Expedition 2011

Dr Lewis has written a short essay in support of the RowZambezi Expedition 2011. A charity event, designed to raise money for WaterAid, it is being organised by a second year History student, Oliver Cook.

Dr Lewis was happy to be able to support this event following Livingstone's journey down the river, and she looks forward to seeing the team at the finishing line nearVictoria Falls in the summer.

Department of International History Annual Lecture: Germany in the World, 1500-2000: Outlines of a Transnational History

Speaker: Professor David Blackbourn
Chair: Professor Dominic Lieven
Date: Thursday 17th March 2011
Time: 6:30pm
Venue: Hong Kong Theatre

The nation cannot be its own context. This lecture considers German history in the modern era from a transnational perspective. David Blackbourn looks at the movement of people and commodities, ideas and practices, pointing to the cross-border contacts and exchanges that linked Germany to a wider world and helped to shape its history.

David Blackbourn is Coolidge Professor of History and Director of the Center for European Studies at Harvard. He is the author of many works on modern German history, most recently The Conquest of Nature (2006)

For further information, contact: Milada Fomina, m.fomina@lse.ac.uk|, ext. 7331 

Abraham Lincoln: Saint or Sinner, Thursday 3 February, 9pm BBC 4

The documentary film about Abraham Lincoln, on which Dr Alan Sked acted as historical adviser, will be broadcast on BBC4 on Thursday 3 February at 9pm. It will be available on their iPlayer service for a week thereafter. For more details, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00y5kdx|

Wes Ullrich awarded the George C. Marshall/Baruch Fellowship

Wes Ullrich has been awarded a George C. Marshall/Baruch Fellowship for 2011 for his PhD research into 'US foreign policy, destalinisation, and regime change in the Soviet Union, 1953-1956'. The fellowship will be used specifically towards research into the prevailing perceptions of the Soviet Union and communism at the outset of the Eisenhower Presidency in 1953 that set the stage for the Eisenhower Administrations interactions with the new Soviet leadership in the following years.
The George C. Marshall/Baruch Fellowships are given to encourage doctoral or postdoctoral research in 20th-century U.S. military or diplomatic history and related fields. The fellowships are administered by the George C. Marshall Foundation – a non- profit, non-governmental institution – and generated from a gift provided annually by the Baruch Family Foundation of Encino, California. The fellowships honour the career of George C. Marshall, 20th-century solider-statesman, and the Baruch family.

The United States, the Cold War, and Military Dictators in the Southern Cone

Speaker: Professor Stephen G. Rabe
Chair: Dr Tanya Harmer
Date: 27 January 2011
Time: 6:30-8:00pm
Venue: NAB.2.04, New Academic Building

The decade of the 1970s turned into a gruesome time for civic-minded Latin Americans, especially in the Southern Cone countries of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay. Military dictators conducted a vicious war against political leftists and anyone else who stood for democracy and respect for basic human rights. In the name of anticommunism and social order, thugs in military uniform and their colleagues in death squads butchered tens of thousands of South Americans. The United States aided and abetted the criminal behavior of Latin America's military rulers. President Richard M. Nixon and his faithful aide, Henry A. Kissinger, believed that military dictatorship was in the best interest of Latin Americans. Military dictators could also be counted on to respect the Cold War concerns of the United States. Nixon and Kissinger cultivated the Latin American military, providing diplomatic and material support to the military authoritarians and rationalizing and excusing their murderous behavior. The U.S. leaders also took credit for destroying the constitutional regime of Salvador Allende in Chile. In the Nixon-Kissinger view of the world, creating a stable relationship with the Soviet Union and a global balance of power entailed keeping Latin Americans in their place-under military rule.

STEPHEN G. RABE is a professor of history and holds the Arts and Humanities Chair at the University of Texas at Dallas. He has previously written or edited nine books, including The Most Dangerous Area in the World: John F. Kennedy Confronts Communist Revolution in Latin America (1999), U.S. Intervention in British Guiana: A Cold War Story (2005), and John F. Kennedy: World Leader (2010). His Eisenhower and Latin America: The Foreign Policy of Anticommunism (1988) won the Stuart L. Bernath Book Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Oxford University Press will publish his forthcoming study, The Killing Zone: The United States Wages Cold War in Latin America in 2011. Rabe has taught or lectured in sixteen countries, conducting seminars on modern U.S. history in Argentina, Brazil, and Ecuador. He has also served as the Mary Ball Washington Professor of American History at University College, Dublin in Ireland and the Fulbright Bicentennial Chair in American Studies at the University of Helsinki in Finland.

For any queries or further information, please e-mail ideas.latinamerica@lse.ac.uk|.

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