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Department of International History

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Department of International History
London School of Economics and Political Science
Houghton Street
London
WC2A 2AE

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in Sardinia House (SAR)

Tel: +44 (0)20 7955 6174
Fax: +44 (0)20 7831 4495

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AlexanderEurope
qsworlduniversityrankings
History at LSE Highly Rated in Major World Rankings

The Department of International History has once again performed impressively in the QS World University Rankings. The QS World University History Subject Table for 2015 ranks History at LSE 6th overall in the world and one of three UK university in the top 10. Last year, the department had been ranked 7th in the world and 3rd in the UK. Other UK institutions featuring in the top 30 in 2015 are Cambridge (2), Oxford (3), Warwick (15) and KCL (27).

At the national level, History at LSE jumped from 8th place to 5th place in the Guardian's University Guide 2016, behind Cambridge and St Andrews, but ahead of Oxford, UCL and King's College London.
 
REF2014

REF 2014 Results

The results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) were announced on Wednesday 18 December. Taking into account the proportion of its eligible staff submitted for assessment, LSE History (Economic History and International History) was ranked sixth out of 83 submissions to the REF History panel for the percentage of its research outputs rated 'world leading '(4*) or 'internationally excellent' (3*) and ninth for its submission as a whole. On the basis of the combination of quality of publications and number of staff submitted, a measure of research power, LSE History ranks 4th in the UK. More information on LSE's impressive performance can be found here.

 
DonaldCameronWatt

Donald Cameron Watt, Professor of International History, Passes Away

Professor Donald Cameron Watt passed away on 30 October 2014. He taught at the London School of Economics for nearly 40 years, joining the staff in 1954 and retiring in 1995 as Stevenson Professor of International History and Head of Department. He was a Fellow of the British Academy and the first LSE academic to be awarded the Wolfson History Prize in 1990 for his book How War Came: The Immediate Origins of the Second World War, 1938-1939.

Read Professor Donald Cameron Watt's obituary written by Dr Robert Boyce. Read the obituary published by The Daily Telegraph.

 

Conference Podcasts: Sir Edward Grey and the Outbreak of the First World War

A series of podcasts are now available from the recent conference, ‘Sir Edward Grey and the Outbreak of the First World War’, co-organised by FCO Historians and the Department of International History. For more details, click here

Recent Successful International History PhD Vivas

The Department is pleased to announce that two of its PhD students have successfully passed their viva examinations recently. Luc-André Brunet’s thesis, entitled The New Industrial Order: Vichy, Steel, and the Origins of the Monnet Plan, 1940-1946, explores the emergence of the Cold War in France and the institutional and personal continuities from Vichy France to the post-war Fourth Republic and the European Coal and Steel Community. Zhong Zhong Chen, whose thesis is entitled Between Political Pragmatism and Moscow's Watchful Eye: East German-Chinese Relations in the 1980s, examines the complex relationship between East Germany and China in a key period of the late Cold War.

Video Series on International History and Dissertation Research

Madiha Bataineh, a recent graduate on the LSE-Columbia Dual Masters programme, has made a short series of videos about researching a topic in international history. The project, which draws on the experiences of a number of her contemporaries in the programme, explores their research topics and how they were drawn to investigate them in the archives. It is an exploration of the historian's work and its many twists and turns. The three short films can be found here: Projects in International History, Letters from the Archive, and A Thought on International History.
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Dr Erica Wald Publishes New Book

Dr Erica Wald, who joined Goldsmiths (University of London) from LSE three years ago, has just published her first book, Vice in the Barracks: Medicine, the Military and the Making of Colonial India, 1780-1868 (Palgrave, 2014). The book deals with the preoccupation of European officers in nineteenth-century India with sex and alcohol, which had serious implications for the economic and military performance of the East India Company. This book examines the colonial state's approach to these vice-driven health risks. More details can be found on the publisher’s page.
 

 

LSESU

Dr Tanya Harmer Wins Student-led Teaching Excellence Award for Research Support and Guidance

Dr Tanya Harmer has won the Award for Research Support and Guidance at this year’s student-led Teaching Excellence Awards. The awards are run by the Students’ Union, supported by the Teaching and Learning Centre and sponsored by the Annual Fund. This year, competition was particularly hard, as students made 1362 nominations for 555 individual members of staff. This is a terrific achievement for Dr Tanya Harmer who last year had won the Major Review Award.
 

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Dr Heather Jones Contributes to RTÉ Documentary

Dr Heather Jones contributed to a documentary broadcast by RTÉ on Tuesday, 21 April 2015, called 'Gallipoli-Ireland's Forgotten Heroes'. In the documentary, David Davin-Power travels to Turkey to commemorate the 3,000 Irish soldiers who were killed at the Battle of Gallipoli during the First World War.
 
InternationalHistoryoftheTwentiethCenturyandBeyond
International History of Twentieth Century and Beyond, 3rd Edition

The third edition of the hugely successful International History of Twentieth Century and Beyond was out in March 2015 with new updates and additions. The volume, co-authored by our lecturers, Dr Antony Best and Dr Kirsten Schulze, and former lecturers in our department, Professor Jussi M. Hanhimäki and Professor Joseph A. Maiolo, features several updates, namely, new material on the Arab Spring, including specific focus on Libya and Syria and increased debate on the question of US decline and the rise of China. The new edition also includes a new chapter on the international history of human rights and its advocacy organisations, including NGOs, and a timeline to give increased context to those studying the topic for the first time.

Read Professor Jussi M. Hanhimäki's interview about he new edition here.

Buy the book here.
 
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"Why My Curriculum Is Not White" by BA History Rayhan Chouglay

Rayhan Chouglay, a BA History at our department, reviews his undergraduate curriculum in "Why My Curriculum Is Not White", published in The Beaver, the LSE SU newspaper on 24 February 2015. Chouglay praises the diversity taught in our department, contrary to what the BME Network campaign, “Why is my curriculum white?”, and hopes to “show other departments and courses what they should aspire to”. Read the article here.
 
Dr Tanya Harmer
Dr Tanya Harmer awarded a British Academy Newton Mobility Award

Dr Tanya Harmer has been awarded a British Academy Newton Mobility Award worth £9,962 to lead a collaborative research project with Dr Alberto Martín Álvarez at the Instituto Mora in Mexico City on "Transnational and Global Histories of Latin America's Revolutionary Left." The project will centre around two international conferences in 2016 on Latin American left-wing movements' transnational and global connections during the Cold War.
 

The Department will introduce the following new courses in 2015-2016:

Hochstrasser2
HY200: The Rights of Man: A Pre-Modern History of Rights-Based Discourse in the West

Dr Tim Hochstrasser

Human Rights are often assumed to have a precise twentieth-century origin in the 1948 Universal Declaration or in the succeeding decades of increasing activism. However, the history of human rights discourse and its practical impact emerged as only the latest stage of a sequence of intellectual debates and real-life struggles in specific historical settings over political, religious, economic rights, broadly defined. Different cultural milieus have produced a variety of contexts for working out tensions between claims by individuals or minorities for autonomy on the one hand and the rival demands of collective obligation and identity on the other. This course seeks to explore an (inevitably selective) range of these historical contexts in order to demonstrate the continuity of perennial themes of conflict between the claims of individual actors and corporate institutions, whether states, churches, empires or other institutions, while also showing how and when key changes take place in the recognition of rights of political action, conscience, property ownership, gender identity and workers’ rights etc. The growth of toleration and free speech, the abolition of slavery and torture, and the role of Declarations of Rights are all examined, but less familiar subjects also find their place. The contribution of the conceptual legacy and historical inspiration of Greece and Rome will be recognised as will the crucial role of the political thought of the High Middle Ages, and at the other end of the course specific connection will be made to the recent development of human rights organisations. In each session a contrasted selection of contemporary writings will be studied to recover the intellectual framework of the discussion and the role of the dispositive political, social, and economic circumstances of the debate are also considered.
 

Professor Matthew Jones

HY325: Retreat from Power: British Foreign and Defence Policy, 1931-68

Professor Matthew Jones

The period between the onset of the Manchurian Crisis of 1931 and the decision of the Wilson Government in 1968 to accelerate the withdrawal from East of Suez saw Britain’s position in the world transformed under the multiple pressures of economic decline, world war, nationalist opposition to colonial control, and the demands of Cold War confrontation with the Soviet Union and international communism more generally. This course examines how this change occurred by studying several central episodes in British foreign and defence policy. Its focus is predominantly on high-level policymaking in the diplomatic, military and economic realms, but it will all give attention to shifts in popular attitudes, parliamentary debates, the influence of electoral considerations, and the larger-scale transitions taking place in the international system. In common with other Level 3 courses, it will include study and discussion of primary sources throughout. Specific topics include the Italian invasion of Ethiopia; the Munich Agreement of 1938 and appeasement; British strategy in the Second World War; Anglo-Soviet relations in the Second World War; the formation of NATO; the Korean War; the Malayan emergency; Suez crisis; the first application to join the EEC; and the withdrawal from East of Suez in the 1960s.

Undergraduate course available for selection starting in September 2015.

 
Marc David Baer
HY459: The Ottoman Empire and its Legacy, 1299-1950

Professor Marc David Baer

The Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) was one of the longest lasting and most territorially extensive of all empires in history. Yet today few know about its nature, whether in Turkey or abroad. Who were the Ottomans? How did they run their empire? How did they manage diversity? How did their understanding and practice of Islam change over time? What was the secret of their success, and what ultimately caused the empire's fall? How do the Ottomans compare to other contemporary empires? What is the Ottoman legacy, especially in Turkey and Greece? What is the significance of the Ottoman Empire for world history? Students in HY459 explore a wide range of historical and historiographical sources to find answers to these and other questions about this fascinating empire.
 

2015

InternationalHistoryoftheTwentiethCenturyandBeyond

International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond
3rd Edition


Dr Antony Best, Dr Kirsten Schulze, et al

 
TheUsesOfSpace
The Uses of Space in Early Modern History

Dr Paul Stock
 

2014

TheLastStalinist

The Last Stalinist: The Life of Santiago Carrillo

Professor Paul Preston

 
SiberiaAHistoryofthePeople

Siberia: A History of the People

Professor Janet Hartley

 
ChileylaGuerraFria

Chile y la Guerra Fría Global

Dr Tanya Harmer

 
NixonKissingerAndTheShah

Nixon, Kissinger, and the Shah: The United States and Iran in the Cold War

Dr Roham Alvandi

 
When Soldiers Fall

When Soldiers Fall: How Americans Have Confronted Combat Losses from World War I to Afghanistan

Professor Steven Casey

 

2013

Restless Empire

Restless Empire: China and the World since 1750

Professor Odd Arne Westad

 
With Our Backs to the Wall

With Our Backs to the Wall

Professor David Stevenson

 
drHeatherJonesViolenceAgainstPrisonersOfWarInTheFirstWorldWar

Violence against Prisoners of War in the First World War

Dr Heather Jones

 
Allendes Chile Tanya Harmer

Allende's Chile & The Inter-American Cold War

Dr Tanya Harmer

 
St Petersburg and the Russian Court

St Petersburg and the Russian Court, 1703-61

Dr Paul Keenan

 

See full list of publications by our staff

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LSE - Columbia University Double Masters Degree in International World History
LSE-PKU

UGOpenDay-July2015