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Department of International History
London School of Economics and Political Science
Houghton Street
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WC2A 2AE

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Events

The Department of International History hosts numerous lectures, roundtables, debates and workshops by our academics, visiting academics and others. Members of the Department are also involved in a series of events at LSE and around the world. Below is a selection of these events by chronological order. Our events are free and open to all. We make video and audio recordings available on this page whenever possible.

Churchill

29 April 2014, Tuesday, 6.30-8.00pm, Hong Kong Theatre, LSE

Department of International History in association with The Churchill Centre (UK) Public Debate: 'Churchill and Leadership: Constructing a Political Icon'|
 
Speakers: Professor Richard Toye|, Lord Alan Watson| and Dr Lucy Noakes|
Chair: Dr Antony Best|

Winston Churchill remains one of the most prominent British leaders in history. This event will explore the political, strategic, and personal dimensions of Churchill's approach to leadership.

Lucy Noakes is a social and cultural historian of mid-century Britain at the University of Brighton and  is the current Honorary Secretary of the Social History Society. Richard Toye is a Professor of History at the University of Exeter and has published several books on Winston Churchill. Lord Alan Watson is a former BBC broadcaster and Chairman of CTN Communications and Chairman of Havas Media UK.  He is also Vice President of the English Speaking Union and a patron of the Churchill Archives at Churchill College, Cambridge.
 

Junkers 1920s

30 April 2014, Wednesday, 6:30-8:00pm, NAB 1.04, LSE

The Nazi-Soviet Pact in the Light of Transnational History: 'Persian Connections in German-Soviet Relations'|
 
Speaker: Professor Jennifer Jenkins |
Chair: Dr Roham Alvandi|

The Nazi-Soviet Pact, a central topic in the scholarship on the Second World War, is generally studied in its political and European dimensions. It was the instrument for the coming together of two unlikely ideological allies in the destruction and acquisition of Poland. By contrast the economic aspects of the Pact are understudied, although they were fundamental to how it functioned. They also worked through transnational networks that stretched far beyond Europe. Professor Jennifer Jenkins will take a new look at the Nazi-Soviet Pact by embedding it in German and Soviet economic policies toward the Near East, specifically with Iran, from the early Weimar period forward. She will also explore the history of German-Soviet-Persian economic cooperation in the interwar period, Iran's importance as a zone of cooperation between Germany and the USSR, and its place in the making of the Pact.

Jennifer L. Jenkins is Associate Professor of German and European History at the University of Toronto.
 

Dr Svetozar Rajak

30 April 2014, Wednesday, 6.30-8.00pm, Wolfson Theatre, LSE

Department of International History Roundtable III: ‘Reappraising the First World War: the Legacy’|

Speakers: Dr Bill Kissane|, Dr Svetozar Rajak|, Professor Max Schulze|, Professor Alan Sked|, Professor Sӧnke Neitzel|
Chair: Professor David Stevenson|

As part of the events connected with the First World War centenary, the Department of International History has organized a series of roundtable discussions on the war. This event will assess the impact and the aftermath of the war on the British Isles and Continental Europe, as well as the links between the First and Second World Wars.

Bill Kissane is Associate Professor (Reader) in Politics at the Department of Government (LSE); Svetozar Rajak is Associate Professor at the Department of International History (LSE); Max Schulze is Professor of Economic History at the Department of Economic History (LSE); Alan Sked is Professor of International History at the Department of International History (LSE); Sӧnke Neitzel is Professor of International History at the Department of International History (LSE).
 

Professor David Stevenson

6 May 2014, Tuesday, 6.30-8.00pm, Wolfson Theatre, LSE

Department of International History Public Lecture: ‘LSE’s War: 1914-1918’|

Speaker: Professor David Stevenson|
Chair: Professor Anita Prażmowska|

Drawing on new research in the School’s archives, this lecture will retrace the LSE experience before, during, and in the aftermath of the First World War.   David Stevenson is Stevenson Professor of International History at the School, and an expert on the history of the 1914-18 conflict.

David Stevenson is Stevenson Professor of International History at the School, and an expert on the history of the 1914-18 conflict. 
 

British International History Group

 4-6 September 2014, Thursday-Saturday, LSE

26th Annual Conference of the British International History Group|

The 26th Annual Conference of the British International History Group will take place at the London School of Economics and Political Science from 4 to 6 September 2014. The conference will showcase several speakers from LSE's International History Department.

More information coming soon.
 

Chris Clarke

7 November 2014, Friday, Lancaster House, London

Foreign and Commonwealth Office Historical Branch & International History Department, LSE: 'Sir Edward Grey and the Outbreak of the First World War'|

Speakers: Roy Bridge, Christopher Clark|, Keith Hamilton, John Keiger|, Annika Mombauer|, Thomas Otte|, Keith Robbins, Richard Smith, Zara Steiner and Keith Wilson|.
This one-day conference focuses on reappraising Britain’s decision to enter the First World War and on the role played by the British Foreign Secretary, Sir Edward Grey. It will examine not only the July-August 1914 crisis but also the pre-war decade of relations between Britain and the Central Powers and between Britain and the Entente. It will consider how other Powers viewed British policy as well as how Britain viewed them. And although its focus will be on Grey’s personality and leadership, the Foreign Office and the diplomatic corps, attention will be given as necessary to other parts of Whitehall, to Westminster politics, and to British public opinion more broadly.
 
Attendance is free but numbers are limited. If you are interested in attending please RSVP, by 6 October, to historianevents@fco.gsi.gov.uk| to be added to the registration list.

See Conference Programme|.
 

  

Kent Deng

13 March 2014, Thursday, 11:00-1:00pm, NAB 2.13, LSE

Lent Term: World History Workshop

Speaker: Dr Kent Deng|

The aim of this workshop was to provide a forum for an intellectual exchange of ideas between staff and postgraduate students across the LSE about new research, advances in the field of world history and recent historiographical debates. Topics of particular interest included histories of the extra-European world, empires, post-colonial societies, citizenship, trade networks, modernity and development, cultural exchanges, transnational lives, migration and exile. On 13 March, Dr Kent Deng from the Economic History Department presented a paper to the workshop entitled, "Absorbing pressure and generating growth: Demystifying China's Early Economic Revolution during the Northern Song Era, circa 960-1127." 

Staff, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students from all departments at the LSE were welcome to attend.

 

Please email Dr Tanya Harmer| to receive a copy of Dr Deng's paper.

Dr Kent Deng is Associate Professor in Economic History at LSE.

 

 Timothy Snyder

11 March 2014, Tuesday, 6.30-8.00pm, Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

The Origins of the Final Solution: Eastern Europe and the Holocaust|
 
Speaker: Professor Timothy Snyder |
Chair: Professor Michael Cox|

The Nazi Final Solution was implemented in occupied Poland and the occupied Soviet Union, in the lands that after the end of the war quickly fell behind the Iron Curtain. The opening of borders and archives has permitted a much fuller acquaintance with the victims of the Holocaust, the vast majority of whom were east European Jews, as well as with the motivation and behaviours of the German perpetrators and the east Europeans who aided them in the murder.  Must the national history of eastern Europe, with which we began, now collapse into nothing more than a prehistory of catastrophe? Or might instead a grounding in national history help us better discern the human causes of the Holocaust?  Only an explanation that can unite Hitler's metaphysical anti-Semitism with the experience of German power in eastern Europe can be satisfactory.

Timothy Snyder is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs for the 2013-2014 academic year.

*Podcast*|
 

Dr Paul Stock

10 March 2014, Monday, 5:30-7:00pm, Kings College London, Centre for Hellenic Studies, K0.31, Strand Campus

Real and Imagined: Philhellenic Travel in the Greek War of Independence|

Speaker: Dr Paul Stock|

This paper discussed philhellenic travellers' perceptions and experiences of Greece in the early nineteenth century, especially during the War of Independence in the 1820s. It argued that the philhellenes understood Greece as a ‘real-and-imagined’ space. Greece was an ‘imagined’ location in the sense that philhellenic conception of it is shaped by certain rhetorical assumptions and priorities. But, evidently, it was also a ‘real’ space, not simply in the obvious sense that the landscape has a tangible existence, but also in that those rhetorical constructions have concrete consequences and expressions.  The paper discussed the significance of this real-and-imagined Greece as conceived by a number of prominent British philhellenes.

Dr Paul Stock is Lecturer in Early Modern International History 1500-1850 at LSE.
 

Dr Alan Best

5 March 2014, Wednesday, 6.30-8.00pm, Wolfson Theatre, LSE

Department of International History Roundtable II: 'Reappraising the First World War: Global War'|

Participants: Dr Antony Best|, Dr Paul Mulvey|, Professor David Stevenson|

As part of the events connected with the First World War centenary, the Department of International History has organized a series of roundtable discussions on the war. This was the second roundtable on the subject which assessed the First World War’s importance in global history, and as a turning point in Europe’s relations with the wider world.

Anthony Best is Senior Lecturer in international history at LSE; Paul Mulvey is a Graduate Teaching Assistant in international history at LSE; David Stevenson is Professor of international history at LSE.
 

Literary Festival

26 February 2014, Wednesday, 7:00-8.30pm, Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

LSE Literary Festival Discussion: Why Remember? Reflections on the First World War Centenary|

Speakers: Professor Michael Cox|, Dr John Hutchinson|, Professor Margaret Macmillan |
Chair: Professor David Stevenson|

This multi-disciplinary panel discussion reflected on the consequences of the First World War and the value of remembrance, including the impact on international relations, the effect on nationalism and the home front, and what photography and narration of the war can tell us about our society.

Michael Cox is founding Co-Director of LSE IDEAS and Professor of international relations at LSE; John Hutchinson is Reader in nationalism in the Department of Government at LSE; Margaret Macmillan is the Warden of St Antony's College, Oxford; David Stevenson is Professor of international history at LSE.

*Podcast*|
 

Dr T C. Sherman

14 November 2013, Thursday, 11am-1pm, Room TW2.3.03, LSE

Michaelmas Term: World History Workshop

Speaker: Dr Taylor Sherman|

Building on the expertise and research interests of scholars at the LSE, the first termly informal World History workshop was held with the aim of providing a forum for an intellectual exchange of ideas between staff and postgraduate students about new research, advances in the field of world history and recent historiographical debates. At the introductory World History workshop on 14 November a general discussion of research interests, work in progress and research news was held before a pre-circulated chapter by Dr Taylor Sherman from her new book entitled "Moral Economies of Communal Violence in Secular India: Muslim Citizenship and Refugee Rehabilitation in Hyderabad" was discussed.

Staff, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students from all departments at the LSE are welcome to attend.  

Please email Dr Tanya Harmer| to receive a copy of Dr Sherman's paper.

Dr Taylor Sherman is Associate Professor in international history at LSE.
 

 

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OTHER EVENTS
BY THE DEPARTMENT (internal only)

Research Seminar Series:

HY509 International History|

HY510 Cold War History|

Staff Research Seminar|


Cumberland Lodge:

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