The Crisis of EU Enlargement

The Crisis of EU Enlargement

Enlargement is widely hailed as the EU’s most successful foreign policy tool, but now faces daunting challenges.

This report looks at why enlargement has been successful in the past and how to integrate these lessons to develop a new strategy.

Read the report:

 The Crisis of EU Enlargement

Authors

  • Biographies from time of publication.
  • Anne Applebaum held the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for the 2012- 2013 academic year. As Warsaw correspondent for The Economist in 1989, she covered the collapse of communism in the region. She is currently the Director of Political Studies at the Legatum Institute in London and a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. She won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction for her book Gulag: A History.
  • Cristina Blanco Sío-López is a Researcher in European Integration Studies and a Project Manager at the CVCE, Luxembourg. She holds a PhD in History and Civilization from the EUI and is also a Lecturer at the University of Luxembourg and a Scientific Committee Member of the ‘MA in European Studies’ at the University of Siena. She is the author of Converging Pathways. Spain and the European Integration Process, published by P.I.E. Peter Lang in 2013.
  • Luc-André Brunet is the Programme Assistant for the Cold War Studies Programme at LSE IDEAS and Managing Editor of the journal Cold War History. He is a SSHRC Doctoral Fellow in the Department of International History at LSE and was Visiting Scholar at the Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po in 2013. His research focuses on the history of European integration.
  • David Cadier is a Fellow in Strategy and Diplomacy at LSE IDEAS and a teaching fellow in the International Relations Department at the LSE. He earned his PhD from CERI-Sciences Po (Paris) in 2012. He was a visiting scholar at the Centre for Transatlantic Relations at SAIS Johns Hopkins University, at the Prague Institute of International Relations and at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. His research interests lie in foreign policy analysis, EU external relations, Central and Eastern Europe and Russia’s foreign policy.
  • Joan DeBardeleben is Chancellor’s Professor of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. She is Director of Carleton’s EU Centre of Excellence and holds a Jean Monnet Chair in the EU’s Eastern Neighbourhood Relations. Her research deals with Russian and East European politics and with EU-Russian relations.
  • Eirini Karamouzi is the Deputy Head of the Southern Europe International Affairs Programme at LSE IDEAS. She is currently a Max Weber Fellow at the EUI and was a Lecturer of European Studies and History at Yale University for the 2012-2013 academic year. She completed her PhD in the International History department at LSE and her forthcoming monograph Greece, the EEC and the Cold War, 1974-1979 will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2014.
  • N. Piers Ludlow is the Head of the Cold War Studies Programme at LSE IDEAS and an expert in integration history. The theme of enlargement has loomed large in his research. It formed the core of his first book, Dealing With Britain: the Six and the First UK Application to the EEC, was a significant issue in his second, The European Community and the Crises of the 1960s: Negotiating the Gaullist Challenge, and will recur in his third which takes a detailed look at the Commission Presidency of Roy Jenkins, 1977-81, a period during which the Greek membership negotiations concluded and those with the Iberian applicants began.
  •  John O’Brennan lectures in European Politics and Society at the National University of Ireland Maynooth (NUIM), where he is also Director of European Studies and of the Centre for the Study of Wider Europe. He has written two volumes on EU Enlargement, The Eastern Enlargement of the European Union (Routledge, 2006) and National Parliaments in the Enlarged European Union: from victims of integration to competitive actors? (Routledge, 2007). He is currently writing a volume entitled The European Union and the Western Balkans: From Stabilisation to Normalisation and EU Membership (Routledge, 2014).
  • Günter Verheugen was European Commissioner for Enlargement between 1999 and 2004 and oversaw the enlargement of the EU from 15 to 25 member states. In his second term, from 2004 to 2010, he served as Vice President of the Commission in charge of enterprise and industry. Prior to this he was a prominent member of the German Parliament for 16 years. Today, he is honorary professor at Viadrina University in Frankfurt (Oder). 

 

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