Events

Siloed Thinking: Systemic Marginalisation in Canada's Indigenous Communities

Hosted by the LSE IDEAS

Room 9.04, Fawcett House, Clement's Inn, LSE, United Kingdom

Speakers

Matthew Eaton-Kent

Matthew Eaton-Kent

Dr Julia Himmrich

Dr Julia Himmrich

Chair

Dr Benjamin Martill

Dr Benjamin Martill

The event will examine the injustices faced by Canada’s indigenous communities by the legal system, drawing on Matthew Eaton-Kent’s experience working in the country’s far north.

The state is comprised of complex, segregated systems. Marginalised people are often required to navigate a combination of some of the most difficult and punitive processes. Inter-sectoral collaboration and communication are vital to understanding the full brunt of these effects. Matthew Eaton-Kent, a criminal defence lawyer in Canada, draws on his frontline and policy work to answer these questions. He will expand on the particular focus of his work on the experience of youth who crossover from the child welfare system to the criminal justice system and Inuit people involved in the criminal justice system.

Matthew Eaton-Kent is a J.D. graduate of Queen's University law school. He earned a BSc from LSE in Government. Alongside his criminal defence practice, he is the Resource (Policy) Coordinator for Ryerson University's Cross-over Youth Project, which is a judicial reform pilot focused on preventing adult recidivism for youth dually involved in the child welfare and youth criminal justice systems. 

Julia Himmrich holds a PhD from LSE where she has held teaching and research positions including being a Research Associate at LSE IDEAS in the third Dahrendorf cycle (2015-16). After her doctorate she was the Research Fellow on European defence at the European Leadership Network (ELN) and taught on European and German Foreign Policy at King’s College London. Her wider research interest lies in European foreign and security policy, particularly in regards to enlargement and conflict settlement.

Benjamin Martill is a Dahrendorf Post-Doctoral Fellow. He conducts research and teaching on European security, Brexit, and British foreign policy. He received his PhD in 2015 from the University of Oxford. Benjamin Martill joined the Dahrendorf Forum at LSE IDEAS directly from the University College London (UCL) European Institute, where he was a Research Associate. Alongside his own research and lecturing, he was responsible for the Institute’s outreach programme, working to increase the public and policy engagement of academic research in the field of UK-EU relations.

LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.

Hashtag for this event: #LSECanada

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This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries contact us at ideas.events@lse.ac.uk or by calling  +44 (0) 20 7849 4918.

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