Home > Centre for the Study of Human Rights > Study > FAQs about the MSc Human Rights

 

FAQs about the MSc Human Rights

1. Where can I get some general information about the MSc Human Rights programme?|

2. Where can I get a prospectus?|

3. When should I submit my application?|

4. How can I check on the progress of my application?|

5. Do I have to send two academic references? Can I send a work one instead?|

6. What is the difference between doing a full-time and a part-time degree?|

7. Do you offer a distance-learning option?|

8. How is the academic year structured?|

9. How are the courses structured?|

10. Where can I get more information on individual courses?|

11. How and when do I choose my options?|

12. What about supervision?|

13. How big are seminar/class sizes?|

14. How much does it cost?|

15. Are any financial awards available?|

16. What's the minimum English language requirement?|                                  

17. What do people do after doing a degree with you?|

18. Can I get a syllabus or reading list?|

19. Where can I obtain more detailed information?|

20. I have a place on the course and am due to start in September. Where can I find information about what I need to do and where I need to go on arrival at the LSE?|

21. Can you tell me about the new visa system?|

22. I have a different question, can you help me?|

1. Where can I get some general information about the MSc Human Rights programme?
Information about the MSc programme is set out in the graduate prospectus|. This provides detailed guidance about the entry requirements for the programme; the structure and duration of the programme and the option courses available to students.  

2. Where can I get a prospectus?
The prospectus| is available on the LSE website.  

3. When should I submit my application?
The program operates a rolling admissions system, without a specific application deadline. Please visit the Graduate Admissions| page for further information about the applications process, a prospectus, and details of how to apply online.  

4. How can I check on the progress of my application?
See Tracking your application|  

5. Do I have to send two academic references? Can I send a work one instead?
If you graduated in the last five years you must supply two academic references. If you wish you may also submit a further professional reference. If you graduated more than five years ago you may supply one academic and one professional reference. Applicants who graduated more than ten years ago may supply two professional references if no academic ones are available.  

6. What is the difference between doing a full-time and a part-time degree?
If you do the degree full-time, it will take 12 months and you will do courses to the value of four units (from October to September). If you do the degree part-time it will take 24 months as you will take courses to the value of two units each year (from October in academic year one to September in academic year two). Teaching hours are exactly the same, whether you are full or part time. Please note that the MSc Human Rights is not available as an evening option.

If you are interested in studying human rights in the evenings, you may be interested in the Centre for the Study of Human Rights short course programme|. The courses are held on consecutive Monday evenings over eight or ten weeks, or over two days. They are taught by leading human rights practitioners and academic experts.

7. Do you offer a distance-learning option?
No.  

8. How is the academic year structured?
The year is divided into three terms: Michaelmas (October to December), Lent (January to March) and Summer (April to July). A full unit course will run over Michaelmas and Lent terms. A half-unit course will only run for one term (please note that half-unit courses are only available in one or the other term - they are not available in both terms). In the Summer Term there are usually revision classes in the first week, and examinations usually (but not always) take place in June. The dissertation is due at the end of August. Full term dates are available at Term dates|. You do not have to stay in London to write your dissertation but it is your responsibility to ensure that it reaches us by the due date.  

9. How are the courses structured?
The structure of courses varies in different departments around the School. Usually each course will consist of one lecture and one seminar each week. These will be from one to two hours long. Lectures and seminars are spread over the week.  

10.  Where can I get more information on individual courses?
There is a LSE webpage called Calendar, which brings together regulations relating to students and their study. Click on LSE Calendar| , then follow the link for Taught masters| for rules and regulations for each degree and then click on Graduate course guides| for further information on individual courses.  

11. How and when do I choose my options?
At the beginning of the year you are encouraged to attend all those courses that you are interested in. You have approximately one month to make your final decision and register for your final choice. Some courses are capped or otherwise have restricted access, which means they have a limited number of places. They will have an earlier registration deadline, and you may need to register your interest at an early stage.  

12. What about supervision?
Each student will be allocated an Academic Adviser at the beginning of the year and Dissertation Supervisor early in Lent Term.  

13. How big are seminar/class sizes?
All students taking a course will attend the same lecture. For most courses the class will be split into groups of 15 students for seminars.  

14. How much does it cost?
For MSc Human Rights 2014 entry the fees are: Full time Home/EU pay £13,128 and full time Overseas pay £19,176. More information about fees is on the Table of fees| website.  

15. Are any financial awards available?
LSE offers a number of small awards that are made at the time of the admissions offer. These awards are allocated on the basis of academic merit and financial need. For further information please visit the LSE Financial Support Office| page.

Sir Siegmund Warburg Scholarship| is a scholarship (paying fees and contribution to living expenses) available for Palestinian and Israeli students. One award is made each year. Applicants to the scholarship must first have been accepted on to the MSc Human Rights at LSE  

16. What's the minimum English language requirement?
If your first language is not English or if the language of instruction of your previous degree is not English, we ask you to provide evidence of your command of English. You should include your test scores, if available, in the relevant section of the application form. If you receive an offer of admission, it will be subject to proof of your score. English tests must be less than two years old by 1 October in the year you intend to start your programme.

If you have not yet taken the test, your application can be considered in its absence, but any offer will be conditional on your achieving the required score.

Acceptable scores are:

  • IELTS (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum overall score of 7.0 (with at least 6.0 in speaking and writing, and 6.5 in listening and reading) 
  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum overall score of 107 in the internet based test (with a minimum of 22 in reading and listening, 21 in writing and 20 in speaking).  

Other test scores may be acceptable if you have already obtained them. You should supply evidence of your English test with your application and if you are made an offer we will indicate whether we will accept your score or if we require one of the tests above. You may be required to achieve a higher score at the discretion of the selectors. If you have not yet taken any English test, we recommend that you take the IELTS, TOEFL or LSE test.

17. What do people do after doing a degree with you?
All sorts of things - work for NGOs, international organisations such as the UN and Amnesty, national governments, consultancies, research organisations, think-tanks, local and national charities, go on to do PhDs, work in human rights law, and much more. See a sample of alumni profiles|

18. Can I get a syllabus or reading list?
Complete reading lists for the MSc in Human Rights are accessible only to registered students. However, the following two books are core reading for the course:

Freeman, Michael, Human Rights (London, Polity Press, 2002)

Steiner H and Alston P, International Human Rights in Context: Law, Politics and Morals (3rd ed., Oxford, OUP, 2007)  

19. Where can I obtain more detailed information?
Have look at the MSc Human Rights student handbook| (PDF) for 2014/15.

20. I have a place on the course and will start in September. Where can I find information about what I need to do on arrival at LSE?

Have a look at Your First Weeks|. Registration information will be sent from LSE in late July and from the Centre for the Study of Human Rights in late August.  

Key dates for registration and orientation at LSE and on the MSc Human Rights programme will also be posted on the Department of Sociology New Arrivals| pages over summer.

If you are holding an offer to start in September, you will have been invited to join the Facebook group dedicated to MSc Human Rights offer holders, where you have the opportunity to interact with other offer holders before you start. If you’re joining us in September and would like to join the Facebook group, please contact Sara Ulfsparre|.

Term dates| are available online and here:

  • Michaelmas Term: Thursday 2 October - Friday 12 December 2014
  • Lent Term: Monday 12 January - Friday 20 March 2015
  • Summer Term: Monday 27 April - Friday 3 July 2015 

21. Can you tell me about the new visa system?
The points based visa application system requires you to hold proof of an unconditional offer before applying for a visa. You must also have returned your offer reply form to use with your passport number on it so we can issue you a certificate with an LSE registration number to allow you to apply for a visa. We recommend that students who require a visa submit their application as early as possible.

Further information can be found on the LSE's Visa Information for prospective students| and the UK Council for International Student Affairs|.  

22. Further questions about the application process and requirements can be answered at Admissions Enquiries|.

If - having read through this information - you have any further queries please contact the MSc Human Rights Administrator, Sara Ulfsparre, at s.ulfsparre@lse.ac.uk|  

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|