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Greed, Humanity and the Neoliberal Retreat in International Law

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  • M. SornarajahThursday 31 October 2013
  • Speaker: Professor M. Sornarajah
    Commentators: Professor John Linarelli; Dr Margot Salomon
  • Chair: Professor Susan Marks

Abstract

Demands for sovereignty over their natural resources and development as advocated by developing countries under the international law claims of the 60s and 70s for a New International Economic Order (NIEO), could find new possibilities today as the neoliberal tenets that challenged the NIEO retreat. Changes in the international investment regime –  from the influence of the rise of BRICS to developed countries now being sued by TNCs – might see favoured a return to ideas of economic sovereignty and public welfare. Covering international investment and international economic law, human rights, as well as development law, the panellists will consider recent shifts in international law and whether we are moving towards a legal order that serves the interests of humanity.

Speakers

M Sornarajah is CJ Koh Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore and Visiting Professor at the LSE’s Laboratory for Advanced Research on the Global Economy in the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. He is the author of the International Law on Foreign Investment (3rd Ed. CUP, 2010) and studied law at the University of Ceylon, Yale Law School, the London School of Economics and King's College, London.

John Linarelli is Professor of Law and Legal Theory, Dean of Law and Head of College, Law School, Swansea University. Much of his research is on global justice, with an emphasis on distributive justice and international economic law.

Margot Salomon is faculty in the Law Department and the Centre for the Study of Human Rights at LSE and directs the Centre’s new Laboratory for Advanced Research on the Global Economy|. LAB provides a hub for creative work across disciplines on theoretical, normative, as well as applied research central to concerns around justice under conditions of globalisation. Margot specialises in international human rights law and global economic justice and has consulted and published widely on the topic.

Susan Marks is Professor of International Law at LSE, and member of the Advisory Board of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. 

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