Dr Grace Lordan

Dr Grace Lordan

Associate Professor in Health Economics

Department of Health Policy

Telephone
020 7955 6768
Extension
6768
Room No
OLD.M2.26
Office Hours
Tue 16.00-18.00
Connect with me

About me

Grace Lordan is Associate Professor in Health Economics in the Department of Health Policy, and co-director of the Health Economics, Policy, and Management Executive MSc programme. She spends her time trying to understand just why individuals have different life outcomes (mainly employment) beyond factors that are in their own control.  She is particularly interested in behaviour by other individuals that affects the life outcomes of others. Her major focus is on differences by gender and ethnicity.

Grace is a research associate at the CEP LSE and at the IZA Bonn. She is also a visiting research fellow at the Business School in Imperial College London.  At the LSE Grace is a member of the Academic Planning and Resources Committee  and The Finance Committee. Outside of the LSE, Grace is on the Royal Economics Society Women’s Committee.

Current research

When studying the causal determinants of important life outcomes, Grace focuses on putting economics to work in the real world, where theory meets application.  Overall,  Grace’s research encompasses the analysis of observational data and applied experimental approaches to the following inter-related topics:

  • Occupational sorting: the role of behaviour, preferences for work content, received mentoring, the role of personality, sorting into competitive environments and selection effects.
  • The impact of discrimination on labor market, health  and other life course outcomes: in-group/out group phenomenon, taste discrimination, statistical discrimination, and selection effects.
  • Incentives-based interventions to nudge compliance. 
  • Diversity and inclusion, worker wellbeing, talent management and choice architecture at the firm level. 
  • Determinants of character:  socialization, innate and evolutionary traits.

Expertise

labour economics; health economics; behavioural science; discrimination; diversity and inclusion; compliance; incentives; well-being