Genevieve Jeffrey

Genevieve Jeffrey

PhD candidate

Department of Health Policy

About me

Genevieve Jeffrey is a PhD candidate in the Department of Health Policy and a recipient of the LSE PhD Studentship. Prior to joining the Department, she worked as a Research Associate with the Department of Economics and Political Science at INSEAD from 2016-2018 on research projects related to social mobility, inequality, and health outcomes.

Before joining INSEAD, Genevieve interned at the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Policy Support Unit working on data and policy analysis on topics such as rural transport development, trade costs, public health implications of intellectual property provisions in FTAs, and the impacts of trade liberalization on gender mainstreaming. She taught Economics with the Ministry of Education in Singapore for the Singapore-Cambridge GCE A-Level from 2009-2014.

 

Research

Genevieve's main research interests lie in health economics, particularly in understanding infant and child health outcomes and their wider implications. Her current projects focus on exploring the factors contributing to nutritional inequalities across income groups and their implications on the incidence of Non-Communicable Diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancers and respiratory diseases and how they disproportionately affect those in poverty. In addition, she is also researching on the role of one’s surroundings in influencing these health outcomes.

Primary Supervisor: Professor Alistair McGuire

Secondary Supervisor: Dr Elisabetta De Cao

 

Education

BSc Economics, National University of Singapore
Post Graduate Diploma in Education (Economics and English Literature), Nanyang Technological University  
MSc Economics of Public Policy, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics

During her MSc, Genevieve did research on the impact of self-reported job insecurity on health in Europe and her MSc thesis examined the impact of income on birth weight in the United States.