David Soskice

 

 David Soskice

 

Professor of Political Science and Economics

Email: d.w.soskice@lse.ac.uk
Office:  CON 4.05, Connaught House
Office Hours: Please email me to arrange an appointment.
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7852 3637

Biography


David Soskice has been School Professor of Political Science and Economics at the LSE since 2012. He taught macroeconomics at Oxford (Mynors Fellow emeritus, University College) from 1967 to 1990, was then research director/professor at the Wissenschaftzentrum Berlin (1990-2005), and subsequently Research Professor of Comparative Political Economy at Oxford and senior research fellow at Nuffield College, and Research Professor of Political Science at Duke.  He has been visiting professor in the economics department at Berkeley, the government department at Harvard, the Industrial Relations School at Cornell, and the Scuola Superiore St Anna, Pisa, and held the Mars Visiting professorship at Yale and the Semans Distinguished Visiting professorship at Duke. He is currently working with Wendy Carlin (UCL) on tractable macroeconomic models; with Nicola Lacey on the comparative political economy of crime and punishment; with Torben Iversen on advanced capitalist democracies; and he gave the 2013 Federico Caffѐ lectures in Rome on Knowledge Economies: Winners and Losers. He was President of the European Political Science Association from 2011 to 2013; he is a Fellow of the British Academy (Politics and Economics groups); and he is an Honorary Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford.

Publications


Crossing Paths, Report of the British Academy Working Group on Interdisciplinarity, Chaired by David Soskice, 2016

With David Hope, “Growth Models, Varieties of Capitalism and Macroeconomics”, Politics and Society, 2016, 44(2), June, pp 209-226

With Torben Iversen and David Hope, “The Eurozone and Political Economic Institutions”, Annual Review of Political Science, 2016, May, pp 163-185

with Wendy Carlin, Macroeconomics: Institutions, Instability and the Financial System, (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2015; pp 638 + xl) 

with Nicola Lacey, “Crime, Punishment and Segregation in the US: the Paradox of Local Democracy”, Punishment and Society, 17(4), pp 454-481, October 2015 (Lead article)

with Torben Iversen, “The Political Economy of Mass Polarization in Advanced Societies”, Comparative Political Studies, 2015, 48(13) pp 1781 –1813 

with Torben Iversen, “Democratic Limits to Redistribution: Inclusionary versus Exclusionary Reforms in the Knowledge Economy”, World Politics, 2015 (67), 2, April, pp 185-225 (Lead article)

with Torben Iversen, “Politics for Markets”, Journal of European Social Policy, 2015 (25), February, pp 76-93

“Capital in the Twenty-First Century: a Critique”, British Journal of Sociology, 2014 (65), 4, November, pp 650-666

With Sam Abrams and Torben Iversen, “Informal Social Networks and Rational Voting,” British Journal of Political Science, 41(2), pp 229-257, February 2011. Lead article.

With Torben Iversen, “Real Exchange Rates and Competitiveness: The Political Economic Foundations of Comparative Advantage,” American Political Science Review, 104(3), pp 601-623 and online appendix, August 2010.

With Thomas Cusack and Torben Iversen, “The Coevolution of Capitalism and Political Representation: Explaining the Choice of Electoral Systems,” American Political Science Review, pp 393-403 and online appendix, 104(2) May 2010

With Torben Iversen, “Distribution and Redistribution: the Shadow of the Nineteenth Century,” World Politics, pp 438-486, July 2009.

With Thomas Cusack and Torben Iversen, “Specific Interests and the Origins of Electoral Systems”, American Political Science Review, pp 373-391, August 2007. Lead article.

With Torben Iversen, “Electoral Institutions, Parties and the Politics of Class: Why Some Democracies Distribute More than Others,” American Political Science Review, pp 165-181, May 2006. APSA Luebbert Prize co-winner
Reprinted in Essential Readings in Comparative Politics (4th Edn), edited by Patrick O’Neil and Ronald Rogowski (WW Norton, Undergraduate textbooks in Political Science, 2012 forthcoming)

With Torben Iversen, “An Asset Theory of Social Preferences”, American Political Science Review, pp 875-893, December 2001.

With Torben Iversen, “The Non-neutrality of Monetary Policy with Large Wage and Price Setters”, 265-284, Quarterly Journal of Economics, February 2000.

Peter Hall and David Soskice, “Introduction”, in Peter Hall and David Soskice (eds) Varieties of Capitalism: the Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage, (OUP, 2001), pp 1-68; in/and Peter Hall and David Soskice (eds) Varieties of Capitalism: the Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage, (OUP, 2001).

With Margarita Estevez-Abe and Torben Iversen, “Social Protection and the Formation of Skills: A Reinterpretation of the Welfare State,” pp 145-183 in Peter Hall, David Soskice (eds), Varieties of Capitalism: the Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage (OUP, 2001)
Reprinted in Essential Readings in Comparative Politics (4th Edn), edited by Patrick O’Neil and Ronald Rogowski (WW Norton, Undergraduate textbooks in Political Science, 2012 forthcoming)

Share:Facebook|Twitter|LinkedIn|